10

A "1 ball bearing" does not mean the bearing has 1 ball. Or 2... It means that the motor / fan has been designed with one ball bearing assembly - which may contain 6, 8, 10 or 12 balls depending on the size and design. For example a caged bearing will have fewer balls to allow for the cage and this reduces inter-ball friction. Otherwise, the balls ...


6

Does anyone know if this would be a good idea? The proposed design has poor rigidity towards torsional loads. It doesn't matter whether the actuator is off-center or if the load is off-center: if load's center of gravity and actuator are not at the same position, the torsional load will likely damage the bearings. In your example with two guide rails, ...


6

Your mechanism is going to lock up like the old car jacks immediately, due to differential raising of the platform. I am sorry but it looks like a textbook example of what not to do. in most real-life cases where the lifting actuator has to be off-center, they use a linked pair of scissors mechanism, like what they do in trucks' gate lifter, or the hydraulic ...


5

Regarding the name, I don't think that there is an official technical name, but then again I'm not a native speaker (nor can I speculate on the function of this shaft which in some cases might lend it a name). However, if you go to any workshop with a lathe you should be able to order one of those. The main thing that you need to determine (apart from ...


5

These are called “wire rope dampers” or “wire rope isolaters”, and their purpose is to increase the time over which recoil energy is transferred into the mounting, thus reducing the peak force.


4

Those thin flaps allow the bronze bearing inside to tilt about slightly and thereby come into alignment with the axis of the fan shaft, thereby minimizing noise and friction. If the bearing as a whole is out of lubricant, then the bronze bearing will stick and can't shift into alignment and the device will be noisy and may also have difficulty spinning up to ...


3

Just prior to this point in the video you can see that the display has been inserted from the front and this portion will be added from the back and screwed in. All that is required is to ensure that there is enough space between the two parts for the bezel flange not to be nipped. Many plastics have a low coefficient of friction with steel or nickel plating....


2

I would imagine they act primarily as shock absorbers to handle the recoil.


2

IMHO (and I guess you already know that), from a structural point of view putting 100 kg at 1/4[m] will create a huge amount of bending moment on a actuator that it is rated for 120[kg]. An although you don't clarify whether the actuator electric/hydraulic, if bearings are involved you are bound to get failure sooner rather than later. Normally this type of ...


2

Unless you're spinning the rods more than 100 rpm bushings should work, are cheaper and easier to work with than bearings. Examples Comment added to answer: the video makes it much more clear what you're trying to accomplish, thanks. Option 1 should work for you. The bearing in that housing is designed for radial loads, but typically a deep groove radial ...


1

Generically called barrel bolts or structural panel fasteners. https://www.grainger.com/product/GRAINGER-APPROVED-Architectural-Bolt-20X885


1

The trade numbers typically give you the envelope dimensions (inner and outer diameters, thickness). Everything else is at the discretion of the manufacturer - pitch diameter, rolling element size, quantity and contact diameter. This is why for the same trade number bearing you might see several different manufacturers, all with different load ratings.


1

The plumber's strap wrench is a very practical tool for this job. Here is one for $ 15.30 from Amazon, just for illustration.


1

What happens in the arrangement is that you are applying a force away from the center of gravity. Imagine you have a pencil on a flat surface and you try to push. If you don't push it around the center of gravity you will cause it to rotate. Although using linear bearings (especially longer ones) will mitigate the problem, you will be creating more normal ...


1

Apparently the bronze bushing/plain bearing is self-centering in the cadmium plated steel holder. The bearing can move slightly to accommodate the position and angle of the motor shaft. Oil would likely help it.


1

You're on the right track. Many commercial mowers have a disk (like a saucer) that mounts below the blade, has two cutouts for the blade, and curves up to catch string and stuff. We have about 10 acres of ponds and a lot of sneaky fishermen. We mow about 150 acres each week, and can pull a drum full of fishing line out of our mowers over the course of a ...


1

I would install a drag rake under the front end of the mower to snag the string before it gets into the blades. Failing that, I would replace the bearing with one that has a metal shield that won't melt like the urethane or neoprene shields will. Also consider inspecting the mowed area for string before starting the job. it might take your assistant an hour ...


1

For that mass, use a large diameter roller bearing supporting the drum directly - just like the lazy susan rotating serving plates used at table. Of course, if you want a low friction bearing then a circular mercury bath is also a solution - used in some lighthouses to get a very smooth rotation for the lenses around the light. But purchasing that amount of ...


1

A one-meter cantilever shaft supported by a single ball bearing is not going to work regardless of the bearing's specs. All cantilever shafts and rods when spinning go into an increasingly unbalanced whiplash motion bending the shaft like a quadratic graph rotating about the X-axis with the centripetal force constantly increasing, leading to breaking the ...


1

If the dimensions are fixed, a careful selection of alloy or hardness that has a higher inherent damping would also reduce deflection while the shaft is rotating.


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