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is there a way to infer what this "inertia term" is? Regarding that part of the question, (although you already are outlining it in your question) I would suggest that the highest derivative is usually assosiated with the inertia term. So in your case the $k_d$ which is conviniently set to zero for the P-controller. The other two examples that ...


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And the question you did not ask ;what about shape/crossection . That is, round and rectangular are both very common specimens .And rectangular with a curved crossection- full wall thickness pipe body. They also make very little if any difference. Note specifications often permit round tensile bars or full thickness tests with the same required mechanical ...


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Usually no. However, yes in a manner of speaking. No: Primarily both properties are material specific. Therefore, no there shouldn't be an effect of the geometry on either the yield or the tensile stress. yes : (*) A typical example where geometry appears to have an effect on yield and tensile stress is the effect of thickness of sheet of steels. Usually ...


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probably not, here is why. the coanda effect describes how a moving mass of air entrains nearby air and sets it in motion. So if we start with an extremely fast-moving but small jet of air, with it we can urge a much larger mass of air into motion. However, energy conservation dictates that the kinetic energy of the large mass of air set into motion be less ...


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