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4

Okay so I ended up having a play in ANSYS Mechanical Workbench. I did a mock up of your problem. Here's how I've been able to successfully model it. Note that a lot of my decisions are based on the Contact Best Practices Guide from ANSYS. Here's some very important points given your problem but also for contact modelling in general and a frictionless ...


3

I dont have a direct solution for your problem but you might want to check your software version. If you are using the student version of ANSYS there might be a difference to the version you are using in class. And keep in mind that the student version is very limited regarding the number of nodes and elements you can use!


3

Given the subject matter my gut tells me to take the time to compute once you've triple checked your conditions. What material properties are you using? You can alter the mesh to decrease cpu usage as well. Just food for thought, but that simulation reminds me of gelatin. If you can find an article that has investigated the hyperelastic material properties ...


3

There are several options for doing this: If there are only a few values to be saved per design point, you could use 'output parameters'. If there is a lot of data to be saved, the report generator may be useful. Some information can be found here: Working with Project Reports An APDL snippet can be used in the results* tree. Some information here: ...


3

The report in your link explains it briefly in the sentence after your quote. The beta term models "structural" or "hysteretic" damping, which is described earlier in the report. The key fact about hysteretic damping is that, for a fixed amplitude of motion, it dissipates the same amount of energy in each cycle of the motion, independent of the frequency. ...


3

I found the answer in the end with a lucky guess: Simply enter "MSAVE, off" into the command line arguments in the advanced solver settings.


2

You can select a single body by this code: agb.AddSelect(agc.TypeBody, bodyname); Here is the script: (Key ideas: First, assign name "GEAR" to the gear body ag.fm.Body(2).Name = "GEAR";. Second, creat gear object by gear = selectNode("GEAR"); where the function selectNode(target) is at the end. Third, use agb.AddSelect(agc.TypeBody, gear); after ag....


2

So if the point isn't a point on your geometry then you can add a Remote Force. It is in the loads menu. You will then need to choose a Scoping Method and choose the faces/features of your geometry that the load will be transferred to. Additionally I think you may need to create that point where the load is applied in your geometry so you can select it as ...


2

"Pressure" is always normal to the surface. "Surface force" can be applied in any direction. As example of a surface force that is not normal to the surface would be snow loading on a sloping roof - the weight of the snow acts vertically downwards, not perpendicular to the slope of the roof. (Of course there must be some friction between the snow and the ...


2

Under the menu PlotCtrls > Symbols, you can find the following window where the option ESYS Element coordinate sys you are looking for is available. As previously answered, it's also available via the following command: /psymb,esys,1 ! or 0 to remove it. You can look for /help,/psymb for more information.


2

You can easily get the structural rotation around X axis for a given node (N) using the next APDL command: *get,Parameter_output,NODE,N,ROT,X. You can substitute X by Y or Z depending the axis you want reference to. You can find more information on the *GET command in the Command Reference Manual about this case on page 742.


2

Merging the nodes is equivalent of a continuous body (see welded). Using a contact definition, means that there are two separate surfaces which are connected through a layer/thin film (although this is a simplification). Using the contact definition means that usually there is a surface and adjacent nodes and/or elements are checked against that surface (to ...


1

Just like any other *get function you can use in APDL, you can loop on each element (or on each element of a group) and fill an array: allsel *get,nbe,elem,all,count wanted_SYS= 11 *del,myarray *dim,myarray,array,nbe,6 *do,i,1,nbe,1 esel,s,,,i *get,myarray(i,1),cdsy,wanted_SYS,loc,x *get,myarray(i,2),cdsy,wanted_SYS,loc,y *get,myarray(i,3),...


1

Solution is based on the fact that the user has an older version of Ansys, in this case user has 16.2. There is the option for lines and quadratic nodes but it is found under automatic method as Element midside nodes. The option are either dropped (linear) or kept(quadratic). The issue arose as my colleagues are using the new version whilst my licence is ...


1

For standard layered-shell sections, you can obtain submatrices [ A ], [ B ], [ D ], and [ E ] via the SLIST command's FULL option or via the *GET command (Entity = SHEL).


1

the possibility of the simulation going wrong can be in two places. Firstly, you chose the material to be wood, which is not a good conductor. This means heat is more likely to dissipate from the face rather than distributing itself in the entire part. Secondly, if you entered the face temperature on the other side to be 25°C, it will be constant ...


1

Many Finite Element programs (such as ANSYS) will comes with several modes for their model. ANSYS comes with a buckling mode as well as a normal stress mode. Simply run the same model in both modes and review. You should find that your answers will tell you the maximum stress (for the stress model) and the maximum load for the buckling. Then you can run ...


1

Compute the wave velocity in a 3.05-m-diameter steel penstock having a wall thickness of 25 mm if it: i. is embedded in a concrete dam; ii. is anchored at the upstream end; and iii. has expansion joints throughout its length.


1

Are you asking which of the two equations you give to use? In the context of a continuous material, the first one is flipped; the second is correct. However, since you're trying to apply a materials concept to a distributed structure, you can't use the strain that ANSYS will output, because this will be the material strain. Better to use $$\nu=-\frac{\frac{\...


1

You can use only C language for writing UDF. As UDF is an add on customization of Fluent, you have to use C language. Because all APIs are exposed in C language only. For automating ANSYS Fluent you can use scheme language. In future ANSYS may provide multi language support, but as of now (ANSYS 19.2) there is support of only C language for writing UDFs.


1

I figured it out. First right click your mesh in the project tree and then click "Clear Generated Data". Then, right click, say your "Node Move", there should be a "Delete", click "Delete", then right click your "Mesh Edit" and there should also be a "Delete", click that.


1

To create a pinned jointed truss structure you only need to define the points, which corresponds to the joints, and connect them using using lines that will be meshed with trusses elements. By definition, the truss elements have pinned joints, so you do not have to worry about modelling each of the defined joints. Example ! 2D Truss Analysis ! /title, ...


1

I think the answer for yor question can be the following command. /PSYMB,ESYS,1 You can find further information in the software, through Help>Mechanical APDL>Command Reference>XVII. P Tamás


1

Your stationary domain can't incorporate the time/spatial dependency that the turbine blades should induce in them. Suppose there's a region of high velocity flow that trails a turbine blade by 10 degrees. When that high velocity flow crosses into the stationary domain, it should cross at a location that is 10 degrees trailing the blade, but that location ...


1

Just look into the help pages (C:\Program Files\ANSYS Inc\v172\commonfiles\help\en-us\help\wb_sim\ds_Contact_Definition.html). A contact object in ANSYS consists of a contact and a target object. When a contact region is defined in Workbench two contact objects are created (symmetric contact), one as seen above, and the other with the contact/target ...


1

I would put a pin through the hole with the proper clearances. The include a contact condition with friction between the pin and the hole. Otherwise the stresses on the lifter will be way off. You can then apply the load on the ends of the pin. If you don't care for stresses on the pin, make it rigid so the bending does not cause edge stress on the hole. ...


1

If the vessels (and the load distribution of whatever they're containing) are truly symmetric (or close enough), then yes, you can simply replace them with four equal concentrated loads at the points where they are supported. If the vessels aren't symmetric but can be reasonably considered to have a pretty uniform stiffness (they don't have two really ...


1

I don't know if there is a direct method for this. (I suppose you already check command reference PDF). But one possible solution could be run both models and compare both the output txt file. You can use a website to highlight the differences between both txt files. I'm afraid there is no other elegant solution. Kind regards,


1

Analytical stability results for backward-time, centered space (BTCS) discretizations only apply to the first order (linear) hyperbolic partial differential equation. The only reason why they are applicable to the navier stokes equation is because navier stokes tends to exhibit behaviors similar to this first order linear wave equation in some cases (e.g. ...


1

You would have to have a raised edge to catch the excess material which will cause some turbulence, the amount of material would dictate the height of the raised edge. Unless there is a material that will naturally attract the media being used, really don't see a way around it. I would try a blade with either side angled upwards towards the middle with a ...


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