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18

Steel is defined as an alloy of iron and carbon; there is no such thing as a non-ferrous steel. If you alloy some other metal with carbon, it becomes something other than steel. Looking for a steel without iron in it would be like looking for brass or bronze without copper. You can alloy things other than copper with zinc, tin, or aluminum, but those would ...


11

That is correct, there are a number of unwanted, or tramp, metals (Cu, Sn, Sb, As) that enter the recycling stream from, for example, car bodies that are ground into scrap without removing all the copper wiring, or tin-coated steel cans. Antimony and arsenic tend to creep in from low-quality and low-cost primary iron sources. The answer to the question is no....


7

Iron and carbon have an interaction which make them different from most engineering alloys. This is to do with both the relative size of C and Fe atoms and their chemistry. Carbon atoms are just the right size to insert themselves into the crystal lattice of iron, this strains the lattice enough that it is somewhat harder and stronger than pure iron. ...


6

To the best of my knowledge, such separation of components is not attempted. I have a friend who at one time worked for Lukens Steel in Coatesville, PA. His job was to write computer software that kept track of the composition of all of the scrap steel they had in their yards and to come up with the correct proportions of which kinds of scrap to use for any ...


5

Unfortunately, your best bet is abusing the existence of isotopes of tungsten to produce "heavy" tungsten. A potential, but unexplored, alternative is to alloy tungsten with an interstitial atom other than carbon. There is no way to make tungsten look or behave like gold beyond superficially, i.e. spraypainting it or electroplating it. No other element or ...


5

To concur with the David Tweed & starrise, it is uneconomic to separate the individual metals in steel alloys. To do so would first require the alloys to be crushed and ground to the size of the crystal grains within the alloys. Then some form of mineral/crystal selection process would need to be devised to segregate and separate the wanted from the ...


4

Damascus and Samari blades are artisan made , so have variations. They were a very clever way to make medium carbon steel before the science was understood. They are a combination for wrought iron ( low carbon , soft, ductile) and a high carbon similar to cast iron ( high carbon). The two materials are layered together , forged and reheated a number of times....


4

Although the time and temperatures may be the same, different things are happening. Tempering generally reduces hardness/strength, but improves toughness. Aging martensite is done for a group of specialty steels; PH-precipitation hardening. 17-4 PH is the most common. During aging, hardness/strength and toughness increase. Precipitation hardening is more ...


4

When I look on the net I found a surprising result : GD seems to stand for German Din (material specifications). GD Zinc is a zinc die cast alloy with 4 Cu and 1 Al. Equivalent to AG 41A alloy in the US. So one of the components is brass ,the other is an ( ordinary) zinc die cast.


3

None, 3003 is listed as better general corrosion resistance but it makes little difference which aluminum alloy is used in a seriously corrosive.


3

It should be doable by hand; the Quora answer missed what I found to be the most important factor for cutting Ti; use chlorinated cutting fluid like carbon tetra chloride. I once drilled small holes ( 1/8 ") in grade 2 or 3 ( lower strength more ductile than 5 ) ; I broke a bit ( high speed steel, not Home Depot) before making the first hole . I used the ...


3

Summary: The Fe-C system, and thus steel, is unique due to a eutectoid transformation from a high-solubility phase to a low solubility phase that allows for a wide variety of microstructures and properties which are highly and relatively easily tunable. Other first-row transition metals have different, and less exploitable, behavior when alloyed with carbon. ...


3

In your situation (as long as you don't actually intend to use the thing!) 6061-T6 will be just fine. The main reason to pick it is that many more product forms are available in it than most other alloys, and it is relatively inexpensive. It is one of the strongest among the weldable aluminum alloys and very easy to machine (as most aluminum is.) The one ...


2

Normally the production of specific alloys is a fairly specialised process and they would be bought in as ingots or other stock types from commercial manufacturer rather than being made as part of a manufacturing process. This is as much about the quality control and analysis required to produce a given alloy to a specification as the actual mechanics of ...


2

First the scrap is separated at the source ; for example cast iron generally only contains Si and Mn. High vapor pressure elements boil off or collected in the flux/slag : eg, Zn, Pb, Sn, Bi, An ,,,,Aluminum oxidizes and goes into the slag. Steels do pick up Cr, Ni, Mo, and Cu residuals , generally these are advantageous ; they all add to hardenability ...


2

No. The only application is historically accurate replicas. While damascus steel has parameters quite comparable to modern hardened steels, its manufacturing process is lengthy, expensive and ill-suited for mechanization and mass production. While its parameters would make it perfectly adequate for many applications, alternatives exist that provide ...


2

Advantages: Makes a lighter craft. However this is only significant for small fishing boats, canoes, punts, where they are lifted out of the water by hand. I can see possible uses in warfare where weight may be critical. In normal use the main energy cost of shipping is water friction. A ship's weight is small compared to it's cargo's weight. Reducing ...


2

You are not making anything ,usable. Bi does not raise the melt point until over 3.4 % Bi, that is lost in this diagram. If your aim is to make aluminum castings , look in a book and do it the way the rest of the world does, add Si. At about 12% Si the melting point is down to about 998 F, about as low as you will get . And,suprise, this is a common ...


2

Short answer , no. They are pretty much at constant temperature other than a couple minutes at start-up or change of power setting. One exception is the few highest temperature turbine blades ( in some engines ) that have a few axial holes through them for cooling air to pass through ; but again they are at constant temperature during operation. Although ...


1

I think you are mixing apples and oranges , or bronze and steel. Aluminum and manganese bronzes both have a "martensite" transformation that modestly hardens them. The reference must be to manganese bronze because aluminum bronze has no intentional zinc. Manganese bronze is primarily copper and zinc with less amounts of Al. Mn, Fe and some grades ...


1

For most alloys, the electrical and thermal conductivities are proportional. This relation is quantified by the Wiedemann–Franz law, which states that the ratio of the electronic contribution of the thermal conductivity (κ) to the electrical conductivity (σ) of a metal is proportional to the temperature (T). There are some exceptions, however, where this ...


1

You can use MatWeb for a preliminary search of materials with desired physical properties.


1

Combining metals does not result in uniform melting points according to the melting points of the components. A classic example is tin & lead, the melting point of which varies according to the ratios, but I believe is always less than either of the component metals. I supposed we'd need a chemist to explain why this is, but I submit that you should ...


1

Marine aluminium is 100 times less prone to corrosion than steel. source link : https://www.aluminiumleader.com/application/transport/ (Not sure about Marine Aluminium vs stainless steel though) For Ships, strength to weight is ratio is not a big deal. But corrosion resistance is. Imagine a ship which doesn't get corrode even after 100 years.


1

It looks like a Russian standard ( GOST ). If so ,it is a low alloy steel with 0.38% C and can be nitrided ( indicated by Al). Similar to SAE 4340 with additional Al which can be hardened up to HRC 60. What is the component ; could it be a nickel base high alloy ?


1

The closest to this grade is AMS 6470 steel, but it does not contain nickel. Furthermore 51 HRC is easily possible via surface diffusion process like Nitriding to improve wear resistance.


1

I don't know about a computer game, but in the real world max C in the skin is more like 1.5 % with time like 24 hours. Carbide formers like Cr, Mo , will increase that slightly.Also there are trade secrets in the "pack" , alkali metals and earths can facilitate carburization and affect C content. High surface C has few applications so most commercial ...


1

As an aside, if you want to bend and play with it. Here's a tip. Get a pot of soap, a gas blow torch and sit by a bath. Smear the part with soap. Heat with the blow torch until the soap turns black, then drop it in the cold bath. Depending on your air temperature you've now got a few hours to bend it to your desired shape. once down leave it in the airing ...


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