27

There are two reasons why. First, for any glue to stick to something, that something needs to be wettable by the glue. A cured silicone surface is bristling with uncrosslinked silicone units which have extremely low surface energy and hence are very difficult if not impossible to wet by glues like epoxy. This means the cured epoxy exhibits no adhesion to the ...


9

Silicone is not a single substance, it is a very very wide range of different types of materials with widely varying properties! All materials that have several siloxane monomers in them can reasonably be called silicones. This can take almost any shape; foams, glues, coatings, rubbers, oils, powders, gels. 3D printed solids, even. Some silicones will adhere ...


7

The material is called "Electrostatic Protective Film". It is manufactured by letting the plastic film cool in a strong electrostatic field: there are high-voltage electrodes on top and bottom of the plastic. This causes the polar molecules in the plastic to align so that one side of the film has a positive charge and the other side has a negative one. ...


4

No, it does not. I do not think that adhesive science people have managed to come up with a fancy name like the lubrication folks.


3

Where a cable enters a connector is a point strain, point strains are remarkably prone to failure. I would not use glue at all particularly a rigid glue like super glue. I would use dental floss or string, and caulk or a curable plastic putty. To begin take a length of string about two foot long and fold it in half place the edge of your connector (the par ...


2

I am not a chemist or material scientist, but it is my experience that reliable adhesion to a smooth Polyethylene surface is nearly impossible even with "plastic" rated epoxy. However where it is a fiber sheet, the epoxy, even with zero surface adhesion, will mechanically hold each fiber it encapsulates. I can not speak to what mechanical properties will ...


2

Bonding to HDPE is very difficult. A few adhesives developed fairly recently do ok in some applications, but that kind of cooling will likely cause them to fail. Instead, I'd recommend a mechanical seal. I would (and often have for this exact purpose) use a bulkhead fitting to seal against the wall and an instrument fitting, aka compression tube fitting to ...


2

A quick search of PVC, the main coating for most cables, corrosion information turns up some answers: Cyanoacrylate, the main component of Krazy glue is not listed in most corrosion guides. Acrylates, the main type of material that consist of most "super glues", are not well supported for PVC (see the corrosion guide above). PVC primer and bonder is ...


2

Cool that you're considering CF, it's a fun material. So first, to answer your questions. If done right it can be fine, but even then it's the least preferable (in my opinion) way to bond FRPs (Fiber Reinforced Plastics). It's hard to do well without special tools, especially in curved and/or hollow profiles, since you need to support the material around ...


1

This is Work-in-progress How does drilling holes into carbon fibre affect its structural integrity? Drilling holes into carbon fibre has very adverse affects. The main reason is that usually the matrix is some sort of thermosetting resin, and as a result it is relatively brittle. The thing is that the drilling process, will separate fibres from the matrix (...


1

You can use cyanoacrylate but I would use a "toughened" super glue that has a rubber modifier in its chemical formula to make it less brittle. Also , super glue vapors have a tendency to blush surfaces with a white film so I would carefully mask off every surface except the repair area with masking tape before you apply any glue. You can use super glue ...


1

You could get 3 compression springs for your 1/2/3 levels of tip. Very high spring rate for #1, medium for #2 and low for #3, depending on what you need. The limit could be once you fully compress the spring (all the coils touch), that much force is how much should be needed to tip over whatever you're talking about.


1

It would depend on the precise mechanism of cure. If the Gibbs energy crosses the zero line and reaction stops, then yes, outgassing will also likely cease. If however, the reaction is limited by the availability of products, then the outgassing rate will tend to zero but never reach it as time moves to infinity. You can use an instrument called a residual ...


1

Almost all chemical processes slow down as you have less chemicals that can react. Same is true for CA glue. As it reacts with water, it becomes harder and less permeable to water and itself. You can speed up the process by heating, adding more water. Process does not hit a state 'all 100% components have reacted' once clock shows that 10 minutes have passed....


1

The issue is not one of safety; it is just that PE, PP and PVDF are almost impossible to get anything to stick to, including glue. It is doubtful that crazy glue would work on it. you can try latex-based glue, this is what's used in stickytape. There are industrial-strength versions which fall under the category of pressure-sensitive adhesives. 3M makes ...


1

the way this is usually accomplished in practice is to use a zip tie anchor which consists of a plastic square with a loop in it through which a zip tie can be threaded. the bottom surface of the square has a piece of doublesticky foam tape (3M brand) on it. When you have the anchor positioned where you need it, you peel the backing paper off the ...


1

You can try ARclear optically transparent adhesives made by Adhesives Research Inc No guarantees though, you will have to experiment to get what you want, of course. :-)


1

Installing enough electrostatic material on your floor will be significantly more work than having a handheld device that you can use to brush off your shoes. This device appears to use electrostatics to hasten the removal of pet hair: The ChomChom Roller is handheld and requires no power source. While it looks similar to the traditional lint roller, the ...


1

I suggest buying extra caps/stoppers and drill a close-fitting hole. If the caps (and your probe/wires can take it), perhaps use some hot-melt glue for a mechanical seal.


1

Try this stuff. It's about as good as it gets off the shelf. 3M™ Scotch-Weld™ Structural Plastic Adhesive DP8005


1

Because the surface is a windshield and because you wish to have it somewhat removable, consider Solar Mike's suggestion of double sided tape, but add in a parameter for outdoor use. 3M makes a great high density foam tape that I've been using for many years to attach miscellaneous items to the windshield. The surfaces have to be clean, of course, and the ...


1

Without knowing more about your requirements here are some options: "Permanent" options: Try a two-part epoxy designated for plastics. Using sandpaper, like 120 grit, to roughen the surfaces helps with adhesion. Alternatively, maybe a double-sided foam tape would work. Specifically VHB tape. If you're using acrylic, you could use the special acrylic ...


1

It will depend on the type of glue you will use Super glue (cyanoacrylate adhesives) requires very thin bond line and their final strength weakness as the bond line thickness increases. 2K Adhesive is quite the opposite as they are a gap filling material and if the bond line is smaller than a certain value (depending on the one you use) the final strength ...


1

Polymers Physical Properties states "Joints made with smaller bond lines are epoxy-starved and have lower strengths." I am not a chemist, but there is some physical amount of space required for the polymerization process. It may be that in confined spaces the polymer chains are more parallel to the bond line instead of randomized (might be a good question ...


1

Many adhesives work best when you have the minimum thickness of adhesive you can get while still effectively wetting the joint. This is particularly the case for unfilled resin based adhesives which tend to be somewhat brittle. In this case a thinner bond thickness results in a more flexible joint with less risk of cracking. However different adhesives do ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible