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One facet of this discussion which hasn't yet been discussed is 3D modelling literacy. Think for a moment about regular '2D Printers'. You may have one at home - but what do you use it for? For printing out artwork to put on your walls? Glossy photo-books for your coffee table? Magazines? Cardboard Packaging? No - mostly, you will be printing items that you ...


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In this case its because they are emulating a bar mechanisms. This makes it possible for the designer to think of the problem in terms of revolute joints which allows them to use age old design principles with parallelograms and all. Image 1: Equivalent bar mechanism In this case the bar is rigid so the equivalent compilant needs to be rigid too. Doing it ...


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h11 is the tolerance range. There's a standard shaft/hole chart based on dimension/tolerance. (sorry about the images, I've searched on google but cannot find everything on the same image). h11 is applied to shafts, and H11 is for holes. With your example D4h11 is Ø48mm with tolerance of -0 to -160 microns. The referenced part can be (48-0,000) = 48mm (...


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I'll start from the particular example you are asking about. It is a positional adjustment device. It is heavily used in laser optical tables to provide micrometer adjustments. And it falls in the category of compliant mechanisms like you suggest. There are a few requirements for these devices (most have been already pointed by others). IMHO, the main two ...


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I believe the key here is not the material, but the manufacturing method. I would not recommend a small cnc machine, which seems to be what you're considering. Those are cool and fun, but you will have to dick around with it for dozens of hours, and it may never produce good results, and if it does, it will be slow. 25 bucks a set for parts is actually quite ...


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Not sure an anecdote will generalise to all applications, but certainly in research we very often resort to 3D printing as a first pass and especially when we need things fast, cheap, when its utility does not justify producing engineering drawings, or when parts are too complex for more conventional subtractive fabrication methods like CNC machining, i.e. ...


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Mineral oil is not used to cool transformers because it is flammable. Transformer oil is a different compound which is not flammable and possesses high dielectric strength. In any case, the temperatures inside a welding arc are high enough to decompose almost all chemical compounds, as Blacksmith37 points out.


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No. In water welding you make steam (> hydrogen and oxygen) and conditions need to compensate for the problem of hydrogen entry in the steel. With oil you are adding the large problem of also adding carbon to the steel. Plus the oil will be cracking and producing a whole range of smaller molecules and probably some carbon and very heavy tar-like materials....


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Most people when asked want to do quite big items. Why wouldn't they? After all they live in a world where objects are table and chair sized. 3D printing usually can not do objects much larger than a pocketbook. Which is in the lower end of the size of things that people want to do. I mean sure at work we have a printer with a cubic meter envelope. But even ...


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I would research component manufactures web sites. It is highly unlikely that you will find all the information in on location. Here our example web site links to get started. NZXT - Mini ITX Computer cases Fractal Era ITX Computer cases Mini-ITX Mainboard Specification Hydro Series™ H100i RGB PLATINUM 240mm Liquid CPU Cooler Another good place to look for ...


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This looks like a wire edm part for those fine interior features. My guess is the design on the thin cuts was optimized for that process - i.e. constant width cut except at the entry holes, which are drilled. Where the "thicker" hexagon-ish zone is, it is essentially not flexible. Essentially all the flexibility comes from where the sections ...


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For traditional parts you still need some thickness for subtractive manufacturing processes to prevent the piece from deflecting too much during material removal to get repeatable parts. The time it takes to remove additional material costs money, if less material can be removed the part can be made for cheaper. Usually you still want some rigidity at ...


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If you've done any 3d printing you must have noticed that the material gets deposited in very thin lines. The end result if you look at it in detail is the following: The two big differences with an injection molding machine are: temperature at exit adhesion between layers. In the case of injection molding machine, the material get injected all at once ...


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Like other have suggested the cost is quite cheap for 25$ per set. The cost of buying, setting up, learning how to properly use a small cnc machine will be at least 2 or 3 times greater if you factor in work hours, and delays. Additionally, what I wanted to caution you about is the choice of materials. The options you mention, have very different properties ...


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As Drews answer says, the key here is manufacturability. I can answer this with 1st hand experience of manufacturing similar parts as a startup. Ideally, a part should have as little steps to produce as possible, CNC machining isn't a silver bullet either, you have casting, injection moulding, laser, waterjet, EDM and of course 3D printing. When designing a ...


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