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My question has two parts.

  • What is BSc engineering and Btech engineering ?
  • Which has the highest validity in electronic and computer fields?


PS : Specially in North American region.

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I think Bachelor of Technology (B-Tech) is mostly a designation used by Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) and National Institute of Technology (NIT). This write up describes

  • Bachelor of Engineering as knowledge oriented
  • Bachelor of Technology as skill oriented

In USA some engineering schools offer two engineering tracks per discipline. The traditional engineering track is more theory base content and is referred to as BSc Engineering. On the contrary the technology track offers more hand on and has more laboratory work.

It is best you look at syllabus for both traditional and technology track programs from a few recognized programs. Here are a few for you to get started.

If you follow an ABET accredited program then you can take both Fundamentals in Engineering exam and Professional Engineer exam. If you pass both the exams per the requirements you can obtain Professional Engineer designation.

Both traditional and technology track are equally recognized. In my experience most students with technology based concentration find work in the area of Product Design, Product Development, Product Testing and Product Service in the respective discipline.

Below are some references that have a broader and in-depth explanation.


References:

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  • $\begingroup$ Mahendra, this is a pretty clear duplicate of this question where you also have an answer. It's better to vote to close as duplicate instead of repeating answers. Duplicates don't have to be exact matches; they need enough to meaningfully answer the OP's question. In this case, the duplicate does a better job at addressing the OP's question. $\endgroup$
    – user16
    May 25 '16 at 12:31
  • $\begingroup$ @GlenH7 yes, I have been looking for that question but couldn't find it. That's why I posted it here. $\endgroup$ May 26 '16 at 4:05

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