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I had a look at this link.

The problem is the orifice is located on the bottom of the tub, instead of the side. The water jet will project downwards, instead of with an X and Y component (as mentioned in the article).

Are there any other methods of calculating the coefficient of contraction of a orifice where the orifice is located on the bottom of the container or do I just have to estimate ~0.62 etc.

See here to see my experiment.

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Unfortunately, these coefficients are not really something that you can derive. They're the combined effect of viscosity, surface tension etc. interacting with the geometry of the orifice. They're usually found experimentally and given either as a single value or best fit function of relevant parameters such Reynolds number, hole diameter/ thickness.

If you've got enough information about setup, you could go looking for an empirical correlation that matches what you've got. If not, go with the single value that you have already.

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  • $\begingroup$ I believe the question was more related to how the experimental methodology provided could be modified to account for the jet being at the bottom of the tank and not at the side. $\endgroup$ May 5 '16 at 12:15

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