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Is there a big difference between salt water and normal tap water in terms of thermal properties (heat capacity, for example)?

If so, can anyone give me a table of thermal and thermodynamic properties of salt water?

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  • $\begingroup$ Not quite what you asked for but a major point to note is that freezing point can be lowered substantially using salt. A saturated salt solution may not freeze in a typical domestic freezer. $\endgroup$ – Russell McMahon Apr 6 '16 at 13:55
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MIT provide a table of water properties at a range of salinity and temperature values: http://web.mit.edu/seawater/

There is also excel/matlab correlations as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ You could mention CoolProp too: it is a C++ thermodynamics properties "library" which has binding for a plethora of languages/programs, including Excel and Matlab. You can think as an "Open Source Refprop". $\endgroup$ – Astrinus Apr 11 '16 at 8:15
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The thermal conductivity of seawater is 0.6 W/mK at 25 °C and a salinity of 35 g/kg. The thermal conductivity decreases with increasing salinity and increases with increasing temperature.

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    $\begingroup$ thanks for the info, what about the heat capacity? $\endgroup$ – majededdine Apr 6 '16 at 8:55
  • $\begingroup$ You can find some additional info here :socratic.org/questions/… $\endgroup$ – Razvan Apr 6 '16 at 11:11

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