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I am trying to come up with a better way to adjust the angle between the two steel pieces in the picture, and lock it in place. At the moment I just have a nut and bolt that I loosen and then tighten, but it is very cumbersome.

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What would be perfect is some sort of geared dial that I could turn which maintains the force between the plates so I just turn it to whatever angle I need without loosening and tightening again. I'm just not sure what exactly I would search for.

Anyone have any ideas?

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  • $\begingroup$ I would recommend closing as "too broad." You can't overcome the frictional force without loosening something -- you might as well just use a long lever arm to force it! Commercial options include a spring-loaded teflon washer, a planetary gear, or cutting radial ridges into both pieces so they lock into a discrete set of angles. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Feb 17 '16 at 15:43
  • $\begingroup$ @CarlWitthoft If u want to answer then answer it below and not as a comment $\endgroup$ – Fennekin Feb 18 '16 at 12:08
  • $\begingroup$ @Fennekin Thanks but I don't consider what I wrote worthy of answer-quality $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Feb 18 '16 at 13:56
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I would suggest extending the fixed bar enough so that a hole could be tapped, then get a wing head bolt and thread it through, holding the bar in place. You are going to have to tighten something if you want to restrict movement.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, no you don't. I have a desk lamp at home with tensioned joints similar to the OP's setup. You overcome the stiction to adjust the lamp angle, then it stays put in that configuration. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Feb 18 '16 at 13:56

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