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I am a draftsman. I make project of mechanical pieces and machinery. Some pieces works like knifes or sleeve, so to reduce the friction we design the ideal material to manufacture this pieces. The steel Vc 130 or 131 are options of choices. What is the usage of steel grades VC-130 and VC-131? What the difference in applications between them, on tools and gears projects?

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm not sure myself but those have a lot of sulfur (~11.5 % for each as seen here). I'm curious what sorts of uses such a steel could have. Typically sulfur causes embrittlement and even grain-boundary disintegration, so perhaps there is an aging heat treatment. The high carbon content must also help. $\endgroup$ – wwarriner Feb 11 '16 at 3:48
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Joás, welcome to Engineering SE. This question is very open-ended; is there a specific, practical problem that you're facing here? Can you give us more detail about how you want to use these steels, and why you are considering these grades? $\endgroup$ – Air Feb 11 '16 at 17:11
  • $\begingroup$ I am a draftsman. I make project of mechanical pieces and machinery. Some pieces works like knifes or sleeve, so to reduce the friction we design the ideal material to manufacture this pieces. The steel Vc 130 or 131 are options of choices. $\endgroup$ – h1k3r Feb 11 '16 at 17:35
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VC-130 and VC-131 are names from the Brazilian standard. A comparison can be found at Paulo Sergio's website. Table 4 suggests that VC-130 is equivalent to AISI-D3 and VC-131 is equivalent to AISI-D6. However, these stainless steels are low sulfur (see the Villares VC-131 page). I think the "Tool & Die Steels" site has the composition wrong.

The main difference between the two steels is the Tungsten content. Tungsten tends to reduce pitting corrosion (see the Outokompu page).

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  • $\begingroup$ 11% S did seem odd to me. Sulphur is sometimes used to improve machinability but I'm not aware of any free-machining steel with more than about 0.3% S $\endgroup$ – Chris Johns Feb 15 '16 at 23:16
  • $\begingroup$ 11.5-12% w/w Cr makes a lot more sense than sulfur. I was hesitant to say, but that much sulfur would almost certainly result in garbage. +1 good find! $\endgroup$ – wwarriner Feb 16 '16 at 1:43
  • $\begingroup$ Actually based on the PDF, the AISI names may be right there. Note the D3 in bold just above the VC-130 in the Nome column on page 13. (Note I do not read or speak Portuguese, so it could just be a coincidence). $\endgroup$ – wwarriner Feb 16 '16 at 1:44

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