1
$\begingroup$

I am looking into making a strong electro magnet. I want it to be able to hold around 100 pounds of weight or more.

Would a magnetic core like this work at all? I'm planning on wrapping wire around one of these 'C' shaped ferrite cores.

How much current should I expect to be using? How many turns or windings around the core should I expect? Is 22 gauge copper solid core wire recommended?

A rough estimate would help very much. Also If there is any formula or information you could add so that I could start to answer some of these questions I would greatly appreciate it.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ It's all about ampere-turns. The core datasheet should tell you how many ampere-turns it works for. You can try with a much smaller value than you need, measure the force, then scale up to find the required ampere-turns. $\endgroup$ Feb 4 '16 at 21:55
1
$\begingroup$

The basic principle is that the force exerted by an electromagnet (solenoid) is proportional to the number of turns in the coil and the current passing through the coil.

The gauge of wire required will be determined by the current. The size of the core doesn't affect the strength of the magnet directly but the maximum field strength per unit area is limited so, in practice it does need to be scaled with the force required.

The best thing to use as a core would be soft iron or steel, it's dimensions are determined by its cross sectional area and the length required to physically fit the core on it. The ferrite core you linked to probably isn't large enough and in any case ferrite is quite brittle and probably won't stand up to being used to lift significant weights.

This calculator should help

You should also note that large electromagnets are potentially dangerous as they can cause injury if you trap your fingers with them and you are going to be dealing with fairly significant currents not to mention the fact that electromagnetic lifting devices do not fail safe and lifting 100lbs needs to be treated with caution

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.