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This is related to construction of a bipedal robot. I have a doubt regarding the stages involved in walking of a biped. In the one leg support phase, when the body moves in a circular path about one leg, who is providing the force? How can the joint at the knee or hip provide the force for the body to rise and move forward?

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I got the answer...Actually, the leg that is lifting up is providing the force by pushing against the ground to lift the hip and move it forward by the time this leg reaches the other side. $\endgroup$ – horaceZettai Jan 20 '16 at 17:18
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    $\begingroup$ Hi Sudipta Borah, welcome to Engineering SE. Please consider writing up a self-answer if you think it would be useful to a broader audience. $\endgroup$ – Air Jan 20 '16 at 17:37
  • $\begingroup$ All engineering aside, that partial skeleton is terrifying. $\endgroup$ – grfrazee Mar 2 '16 at 14:08
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Bipedal walking has been aptly compared to the art of controlled falling. And once we consider that perspective, it's a little easier to describe what's taking place when someone is walking.

Roughly speaking, the following stages occur during a single step:

  1. Subject's stepping foot is lifted up through a combination of the quadriceps and gluteus muscles.
  2. The subject's center of gravity is shifted forward, and the subject starts to fall forward. This is where forward motion from walking comes from.
  3. Subject places stepping foot on the ground and stops the falling motion.
  4. Various minor adjustments are made to assure both forward and lateral stability.

From there, the process repeats for the next step(s).

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