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What soundproofing material can I replace the foam in my Sthil earmuffs with to block out leaf blowers completely. I mean the absolute highest power blackout capability possible.

Crazy ideas welcome, e.g. fill the cups with silicone etc..

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  • $\begingroup$ questions that have many potential correct answers are not suitable for this site... please add a focused, answerable question to your post $\endgroup$
    – jsotola
    Mar 27 at 17:28
  • $\begingroup$ Get one of those Airforce helmets with the advanced noise cancelling: will get rid of the leaf blower no problem, not sure you will like the price though... $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Mar 27 at 18:37
  • $\begingroup$ this isn't a valid question for the site, but the best hearing protection is wearing plugs PLUS muffs $\endgroup$
    – Tiger Guy
    Mar 27 at 20:05
  • $\begingroup$ distance is a good device too, you could have some remote controlled leaf blower drone that keeps your eardrums safe (not to mention blowing leaves is that sisyphean task that has to be done for obscure reasons) $\endgroup$
    – user47320
    Mar 28 at 21:54

2 Answers 2

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None.

High-quality hearing protection already reaches the limits of what earplugs or earmuffs can provide. The remaining sound is transmitted through your body, so any further improvements would require a sound-dampening helmet, body suit, or room.

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There are two passive (and hence cheap) engineering methods to block sound transmission: 1) mass and 2) damping. Regarding mass, in the days when movies were shot with film cameras, the cameras were sometimes wrapped up inside bent pieces of lead sheeting to muffle the sound of the motors moving the film around inside the camera. The sound waves striking the inside of the lead sheet were almost entirely reflected off the sheet and hence could not escape. Regarding damping, the idea instead is to completely absorb the incident waves as they travel through the blocking material so nothing is left to be radiated away. Lightweight foam and fiber batting are good for this purpose.

So, the "Nielsen Ultimate" passive earmuffs would have housings cast out of lead about 3/16" thick and lined on the inside with foamed plastic. They will be uncomfortably heavy.

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  • $\begingroup$ 3) reflection via different masses of the transmitting mediums $\endgroup$
    – Tiger Guy
    Mar 28 at 13:31

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