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Case 1

The development of Case 1 of this problem in which the axes of the prisms intersect at right angles, is shown in Diagram 1. Note that interedge lines are required for the development of both solids, their positions being found by projectors drawn from the different views of the drawing to the full view of the end.


Case 2

Case 2 of the problem in which the axes intersect at 45°, is developed in a similar manner. The projections for this are shown on the plate at Fig 1(a). In order to avoid confusion of lines, projectors are sometimesdrawn as shown on this plate, that is, only rheir starting points are indicated, as between the two views of the octagonal prism in this drawing. First, reproduce the projections. Next, develop the strechouts for the solids on the lines MN and M'N', and draw edge and interedge lines through their respective points. The positions of the interedge lines are found by projecting the point A in the plan across to the full view, as shown in (d) afterwards locating the points x and y at x' and y' in (d'); then they are projected to the elevation and carried to the development in the usual manner, the resulting figures at (b) and (c) completing the development of the solids.

What I need to know is, should both drawings be drawn in an elevation and plan way? And where exactly is the problem in both cases that should be developed?

Diagram 1 Diagram 2

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  • $\begingroup$ My name is Jacques, I'm from cape town. I'm also at intec but I have the same problem did you get the answers? Because I don't know what is going on!!! $\endgroup$ – user7139 Jul 5 '16 at 16:37
  • $\begingroup$ @jacques101 I edited your comment to remove your email, as having people e-mail answers to each other defeats the purpose of a Q&A site. The original poster will get a notification that you have commented, if they are still active, and will be able to answer their own question if they've arrived at a solution. Also, the activity has bumped the question so it will be more visible to the community and might attract answers from other users. $\endgroup$ – Trevor Archibald Jul 5 '16 at 19:31

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