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Here's my situation:

enter image description here

I'm trying to drop a payload via parachute with some accuracy. I'm worried that in the above setup, the line will interfere with parachute deployment or - if not deployment - operation during flight (imagine wind pushing the chute into the line).

I haven't tested this yet but plan to. Does anyone know how the payload to anchor connection might be engineered to ensure full deployment throughout the descent?

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  • $\begingroup$ How flexible is the parachute? If it is somewhat stiff, it may just roll off of the guide rope. $\endgroup$ – hazzey Oct 20 '15 at 21:16
  • $\begingroup$ @hazzey it's quite flexible... hopefully if it does hit the wire on descent, enough air will be hitting the chute for it to bounce/roll off like you said. Any thoughts on where the line should be attached? (edge of parachute vs payload vs top vs ?)? $\endgroup$ – BLAZORLOVER Oct 20 '15 at 21:22
  • $\begingroup$ I think having the anchor line going through the center of the parachute (and payload) would be your most reliable option. It shouldn't be too difficult to pack a parachute in such a way so that it can deploy around the anchor line. Any other connection mechanism runs the risk of getting tangled. $\endgroup$ – atom44 Oct 20 '15 at 21:38
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As the diagram shows you may be able to use a standoff arm to maintain separation between the payload and the guide line. However friction between the standoff and the guide line may cause the two to tangle or jam.

Given no knowledge of the payload layout or size. You could run the guide line down the center line of the paracute, not sure if it would be better to continue down center of payload or route the line around the perimeter.

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The chute should probably be shaped to pull itself away from the line like a kite.

It may be simpler however to use the line itself as the brake instead of using a parachute.

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  • $\begingroup$ Using the guide line as a brake would require the line and upper mount to have a load rating of the entire payload rather than just the expected force of derivation in direction. $\endgroup$ – Dopeybob435 Oct 21 '15 at 13:43
  • $\begingroup$ The line must be able to handle large unexpected loads due to wind and the anchor mass/hook tension. The upper mount need not be much stronger than the payload deployment point and could be the same. Have you considered how to detach the anchor and/or payload when it reaches the ground, this may be more prescriptive in selecting your arrangement. $\endgroup$ – KalleMP Oct 24 '15 at 18:59

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