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How to construct this orthographic projection into an isometric projection? I really don't get the picture on how this orthographic projection turn into isometric projection. There's also some missing line that we should find. I already tried by making a cube first, but I could not understand what I'm doing

Note : It is an third angle view

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Use the ortho to figure out what the object might be. If you had to make it out of clay, what would it look like? Or better if you had to cut out flat faces from paper, what would each look like? $\endgroup$
    – Abel
    Oct 1, 2023 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

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enter image description here

Isometric of (a) showing hidden lines. Hidden line added on bottom right view.

enter image description here

Isometric of (b) showing hidden lines. Addition of diagonal on bottom right view means that both the angled and vertical faces can be flat.

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I cannot figure out what a) is depicting.

My best guess is shown below, but the top view is missing the blue surface.

fig4

You can construct a solid from b) without having to add any missing sketch lines.

First is the skeleton for the model based on the orthographic views

fig1

and the solid with faces color-coded.

fig2

Note that the above involves some not-very well-defined surfaces (green) being a ruled surface resulting in a hyperboloid.

An alternative construction that is not a single solid body, but rather two triangular wedges on top of each other.

fig3

As you can see the given info can be interpreted in multiple ways. Typically features are made of simple shapes (planes, spheres, cones, doughnuts, etc.) and a good drawing will make it clear what the design intent is by providing additional detailed views to clarify any ambiguities.

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