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Link https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matpr.2022.10.252.

From the given link,the line which I am having doubt is mentioned below -

"Abrasive Water Jet Cutting (AWJC) is one of the most suitable cutting processes for glass type brittle materials due to method’s unique properties such as multidirectional cutting capacity, cool machining process that is best suited for machining brittle and heat-sensitive materials like glass, quartz, sapphire, and ceramics etc."

My specific doubt from the paragraph is mentioned below-

Glass is a brittle material, hence we used non conventional method ...

But I am not able to understand why specifically we used AWJC?

In this following paragraph, it did mention about multidirectional cutting capacity as well as cool machining, that is what I am not getting to understand.

Can anyone explain in simple terms,

  • What is multidirectional and cooling?
  • Why other non-conventional method isn't used?
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What is multidirectional and cooling?

They are not related.

Multi-directional may refer to the ability to cut in any direction on the plane whereas, for example, a circular saw could only cut in one direction - a straight line. AWJC may also be able to cut at a moderate angle to apply a bevel to the edge of the cut.

There is no mention of cooling in the article. Instead it says that AWJM is capable of cool machining which means that there is no heat generated by the cutting operation - or if there is it is carried away by the fluid.

Why other non-conventional method isn't used?

The article isn't discussing other methods. It is discussing AWJM. Other methods may be used by various industries but that is not the topic of the referenced article.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for answering so quick and even keeping things simple @Transistor $\endgroup$
    – user87284
    Jul 28, 2023 at 18:30

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