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Let's imagine this situation https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTxrzyl_E9ig49eoN3MRO4EvmTI30cJ-BwTyA&usqp=CAU There is some hydrostatic pressure in the supply tank which causes the water to flow to the pump, which then pumps this water upwards. Due to some law of physics, I would assume that the pump cannot generate a flowrate higher than it's supply flowrate (it can't put out more water than comes in).

The water flow from the container is proportional to the height of the water. It drops as the tank empties.

Is it correct to say that the pump flowrate will also drop over time during this transfer? And you cannot affect this by increasing the pump RPM?

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Pumps are designed to do one of two things or both:

  1. inlet suction head

  2. increase head across the pump.

So, some pumps will 'draw' or "suck" fluid better than other so they can be mounted above the surface of the fluid they pump. Other pumps are not designed to deal with a negative head at the inlet and require a positive inlet head ie they need to be below the surface of the fluid they pump.

This means that the work done by the pump may or may not include the inlet head.

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