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What is "hot-cure resin"? Is it the resin that has been once melted and solidified again?

It is used talking about the big glassy boxes shown in this image. Here is the context:

Working with neuroscientists Steve Smith and Mark Lythgoe, Cattrell captured fMRI digital data relayed while subjects were caught in the act of looking and listening, and then used RP to transform these isolated processes into computerised virtual models. Out of these she made waxy resin sculptures, embedding them in solid square ‘brain-boxes’ made of transparent hot-cure resin.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello @user3091, could you add a bit more information or context to your question? Maybe you could provide a link or an image. $\endgroup$
    – rul30
    Sep 23, 2015 at 5:34
  • $\begingroup$ A common kind of hot-cure compound is Polymer Clay - a variant of plasticine that becomes permanently rock-hard after being baked in an oven. I don't know compounds that would be transparent and liquid before hot-curing (that is usually achieved through chemical curing in case of most resins), but it's quite likely there are some such on the market. $\endgroup$
    – SF.
    Sep 25, 2015 at 8:16
  • $\begingroup$ BTW, I'd imagine they used misnomer: many polymers melt in high temperature and cure/solidify when cooling down. So this could have been items dunked in hot molten polymer which then solidified when cooling down (but still hot). This is not how hot-curing works, but I wouldn't be surprised if they used that term in relation to the described process. $\endgroup$
    – SF.
    Sep 25, 2015 at 11:47

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Sounds like a thermosetting polymer resin that cures (reacts to form crosslinks, making it solid) at temperatures above room temperature. Hence "hot-cure." Though, in fairness, I've never heard that term. Curing is a thermally activated phenomenon, and, barring limiting kinetic effects, proceeds exponentially faster with linear increases in temperature. In that sense, all thermosetting resins are hot-cure.

Also, while resin can be used to refer to a thermoplastic melt, or a thermoset, it almost always refers to the latter. In that case, the resin can't be melted or re-melted once it has cured, because a thermosetting chemical reaction has taken place which can't be reversed by thermal action alone. Curing in the context of resin generally refers to that thermosetting chemical reaction.

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