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I am using this little internal turning tool I have gotten from some company long ago as it was too worn out for them to use. By the time i gotten it for me as hobbyist, it was stil good for me to do some simple turning. Now after some time I think it starts to wear out. I would like to buy a new one, but I cannot figure out what kind of internal turning tool this is. Perhaps some internal turning tool to make internal screw thread?

Can someone help me to identify what kind of tool this is and where it is used for so perhaps I can find a new one to buy. The thing itself is like 3cm so it is pretty small.

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  • $\begingroup$ You can't sharpen it with a bench grinder? $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 26, 2023 at 19:06
  • $\begingroup$ I been told that inserts cannot be sharpen again, they told me it was the same case with this one, do you think it can? $\endgroup$
    – Bart
    Feb 26, 2023 at 19:09
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    $\begingroup$ That is not an insert which means it can be sharpened. The reason you can't sharpen inserts is because they have complex chip breaker geometries, coatings, and are intended for use in CNC which requires a repeatable geometry and nose radius. The geometry on your tool is much more simpler and I assume you are using a manual lathe? It will just take different grinding wheels to sharpen depending on whether it is steel or carbide. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 26, 2023 at 19:13
  • $\begingroup$ I dont know, its light magnetic, does this imply it is steel? Or is there an other way I can check? And yeah its a simple manual lathe. $\endgroup$
    – Bart
    Feb 26, 2023 at 19:17
  • $\begingroup$ Light magnetic probably means it's carbide due to the small amount 6-10% cobalt binder being used to hold the tungsten carbide particles together, because if it's HSS then it should be strong magnetic...because steel. Yeah, if it's a manual lathe and a simple geometry tool then you can just sharpen it. You're supposed to use a green wheel for carbide but they aren't healthy. You could try a regular aluminum oxide wheel but it will take a long time if it takes at all. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 26, 2023 at 19:18

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It looks a lot like a PH HORN 105 system boring insert, e.g.

And you can get a holder for it, e.g.

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  • $\begingroup$ Wow someone actually found it. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 28, 2023 at 5:37
  • $\begingroup$ I am actually suprised how expensive those are for a little tool. $\endgroup$
    – Bart
    Mar 1, 2023 at 7:15

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