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I live in a tall, older apartment building with a modest workout area. There is a smith machine loaded with about 500 lbs of weight. The floors are padded with a rubbery material. I have deadlifted in this room, infrequently, and being mindful of how I set the weights down. However, I usually stay between 100-200 lbs as I have not had a conversation with the manager regarding the load that this room can structurally support. What I am trying to say is that, the room seems to have been reinforced, or at least, cleared for the load associated with most gym activities.

I would like to hang a ~40 lbs punching bag in this room from the smith machine. However, I don't want to contribute to significant structural aging of the building. I have a really poor understanding of physics, and load. I am wondering whether, the bouncing of a punching bag, could be significantly more load than the smith machine that is already in use. I am thinking a 35-40 lbs punching bag, perhaps, bungeed to a weight on the floor to avoid excessive swing. Obviously, the final word should come from the building manager regarding any kind of consultation that has been done about this room in the building. I am just trying to get a general idea.

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    $\begingroup$ you on the floor is a bigger load than a heavy bag hanging from a smith machine $\endgroup$
    – Tiger Guy
    Commented Jan 13, 2023 at 3:56

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If a 40 lb bag has a noticeable effect on the structural stresses in your building, you need to run out of the building right now, cause it will collapse at any moment.

In seriousness, in a building that meets US code, it is a non-event.

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  • $\begingroup$ Haha Thank you! $\endgroup$
    – Charlie P
    Commented Jan 17, 2023 at 6:06

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