0
$\begingroup$

I am building a static structure where I need to connect two parts together with the following constraints (please refer image): enter image description here The top part (as in the image) reaches temperatures of about 70-80 degrees celsius. This is to be connected to a load cell. Load cells are highly sensitive to temperature. So I need to put some insulating components between the top part and the load cell. The connecting part will experience forces in the range of 10-20 kg. Dimension of top part = 15 cm in length.

What materials can do this job? The material needs to have the following properties: Bad conductor of heat. Structurally strong enough to sustain the loads mentioned.

The material should also be easily available and not too expensive. Should either be easily able to cut or be 3D printed (on a normal plastic 3D printer).

$\endgroup$
5
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ When you say "strong" do you really mean stiff or rigid? Because something like silicone foam won't break apart under 20kg but it is compressible? Can you just risers? Or wood? $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Jun 30 at 4:57
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Hey, I think wood is a great and easy solution! Thanks $\endgroup$
    – Atharva
    Jun 30 at 5:05
  • $\begingroup$ @DKNguyen I doubt if wood will work. Because the wood will be squeezed in between. But it will be connected through screws. Will the screws not conduct heat? $\endgroup$
    – Atharva
    Jun 30 at 9:37
  • $\begingroup$ So use screws made of a plastic that can withstand 80C such as glass-reinforced nylon or PEEK. Or use stainless steel or titanium screws which are less thermally conductive than steel, brass or aluminum. Or add wood risers under the plate and use different screws to secure the component to the wood and the wood to the load cell. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Jun 30 at 18:49
  • $\begingroup$ @DKNguyen Thanks a lot! Sounds good. I will go ahead and try these and see what works. $\endgroup$
    – Atharva
    Jul 1 at 4:31

1 Answer 1

0
$\begingroup$

I did a study on this for my MIT materials engineering degree a few years ago. I believe you are looking for Zimbabwean vermiculite. I don't know about its electroconductive properties but unexpanded is thermal resistance is very high.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.