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Background

So I am looking at this piece titled "Ring" and I cant figure out what I am missing in the drawing that cause the elliptical shape at the two hole entrances on the right side of the drawing and the half ellipse in in the section cut.

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Close up of oval in right portion of drawing:

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Oval shape in section?

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What I have tried

When I modelled it I wound up getting this:

enter image description here

Since this is not my field of expertise, the only thing I could think of something like a grinding wheel taking a rounded chunk out at each hole.

Question

Aside from scaling the drawing, does anyone have ideas what is causing the oval shape, and why it would be there?

Update

Isometric views as requested:

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  • $\begingroup$ Probably because the hole is drilled perpendicular to one surface but that second surface is not perpendicular. $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jun 23 at 6:50
  • $\begingroup$ @SolarMike I agree that what you are describing would generate an elliptical shape. Why would you wind up with a circle in the middle of the ellipse? I had actually considered that for the sloped holes, but the ellipse was in the wrong direction. $\endgroup$
    – Forward Ed
    Jun 23 at 6:54
  • $\begingroup$ What happens if you have two circles that intersect at an angle? then consider at which angle you view it from? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jun 23 at 7:09
  • $\begingroup$ @SolarMike The inner holes that are put in at an angle, show the path of the hole which does not allow for left right boring angles which would generate the ellipse $\endgroup$
    – Forward Ed
    Jun 23 at 7:17
  • $\begingroup$ Why would you need "boring angles" ? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jun 23 at 7:18

2 Answers 2

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Very rough image:

enter image description here

A cylinder, or hole through an object when viewed on the axis looks like a circle, or rectangle when perpendicular to the axis.

But at an angle to the axis then the ends of the cylinder show a "curved" end - due to the viewing angle.

The effect of your hole going through curved surfaces shows the cuts as the dotted lines you are concerned about.

You might find that a textbook would help you, see enter link description here

for some examples.

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  • $\begingroup$ Totally agree. As the cylinder axis is rotated away from the viewing angle, the width of the ellipse is equal to the diameter of the circle. The other sides of the ellipse will shrink (in the direction of the tilt). Basically the ellipse can never be larger than the cylinder's circle. The ovals from the inner ring got larger in the wrong direction. For the other ring the view is straight down the axis of the hole, so there should be no oval at all. At least that is what is going through my head $\endgroup$
    – Forward Ed
    Jun 23 at 8:27
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The hole is through a cylindrical surface running perpindicular to the axis of the hole. The arc diameter of the curved surface is likely to be greater than the hole diameter making the elliptical shape in plan view.

The hole is then chamfered with an angular bit (usually 45° bit) to remove sharp edges so countersunk bolts may be used for a flush fit.

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think you've got this right. The upper hole in the second image is perpendicular to the view so we're looking straight through it. Can you do a 3D drawing of how a 45° chamfer would give the ellipses and what the straight and curve are beside the 8 mm diameter in the cross-section view? The question has me puzzled. $\endgroup$
    – Transistor
    Jul 10 at 20:15
  • $\begingroup$ I agree that an angled drill hole/cut on both sides would produce an oval outline in plan and the D shape in section. As for countersunk bolt, are you saying this chamfered area is creating a shoulder for the bolt to rest on? Since its an 8 mm dia through hole, I am not sure how a counter sunk bolt would work here. I need to find some damned assembly drawings! $\endgroup$
    – Forward Ed
    Jul 11 at 8:54

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