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If a car is moving with a constant velocity this means that resistive loads (like air drag friction) should equal the driving force from the car; but I know that the governors always cancel the effect of these resistive loads acting on the engine by supplying more fuel.So how will the cars move at constant speed if always any change in load due to resistive forces(like friction gravity ..etc) is cancelled from the governor by supplying more fuel?

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Governers aren't really a thing on road-going vehicles. Governors are used on constant speed engines to maintain an engine speed. Single speed road vehicles aren't very useful.

A governor works by feeding more or less fuel as engine load changes. Lawn mowers typically have a simple governor that maintains engine speed as load (more or less grass) changes. Industrial diesel engines may have a governor to maintian speed for a generator, air compressor, etc. Some governors can be adjusted and some will always have a set speed.

Governers do not always supply "more fuel." They supply enough fuel to maintain the desired engine speed.

I leave out the cateory of Cruise Controls, which I consider just an automated version of a foot on an accelerator pedal.

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The only cars which contain governed engines are those which have a device called cruise control installed. When turned on, this device measures and then "locks onto" the current speed of the car and if the car slows down, it automatically feeds more fuel to the engine and if it speeds up too much it cuts back on the fuel. This allows the driver to maintain the setpoint speed without constant adjustments using the gas pedal and brake.

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