2
$\begingroup$

If two 24in x 6in x 1in thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum are temporarily bonded together with 3M Super Trim Adhesive (MSDS), would this be a nightmare to separate?

The plate is rated for a max temperature of 572°F (300°C) so I was hoping that a heat gun and thin putty knife would make separating easy without affecting the temper much. But the adhesive information only states "heat resistant." Is this asking for trouble?

Edit: Why I don't want to use clamps - the sandwich is too large to be mill-drilled all at once, so it must be repositioned. The holes must be at (close as possible) right angles to each other, so the pieces cannot shift while moved and re-indexed.

$\endgroup$
3
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ What's wrong with clamps? If you're worried about marring use aluminum, brass, or even wood shims. If for some unfathomable reason I actually needed to use adhesive, I would use double sided tape and apply it to the corners or the edges but I'm thinking that's overkill. Depends on the drill diameter I guess. The thickness give you space to wedge apart it with a wood wedge apart or pour in solvent. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Jun 4 at 16:28
  • $\begingroup$ No, not a nightmare. They aren't going to come apart. $\endgroup$
    – Phil Sweet
    Jun 4 at 19:55
  • $\begingroup$ I do have some small 4-mil double-sided tape strips (like for phone repair); thinking that might be a better idea... and only at the long ends. $\endgroup$
    – rdtsc
    Jun 4 at 20:17

2 Answers 2

3
$\begingroup$

Yes, it would be a nightmare to separate. That adhesive is designed for high strength, temperature resistant applications. That max temp is the point at which it looses it's rated strength. It may still be a ginormous pain to get apart even at significantly higher temperatures.

If a spray-on solution is a must, try a weaker option like 3M™ Repositionable 75 Spray Adhesive which is meant to be removed after application.

If a high-strength adhesive is essential, use hot-melt glue which you can melt to release after you're done machining or cyanoacrylate glue which you can remove with acetone (though it may take a while to soak).

My final thought for you is to tack in some bolts, rivets, or welds and then remove them when you're done.

Best of luck!

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ I ended up using 4-mil double-sided adhesive tape, several thin pieces on the edges. It worked, but there was some slight shifting due to the rubbery nature of adhesive even this thin. Next time, I'll try a few drops of superglue gel and solvent/heat to loosen. $\endgroup$
    – rdtsc
    Jun 18 at 13:37
3
$\begingroup$

Two flat metal plates can be stuck together just by a thin layer of grease.

Then work to be drilled needs clamping anyway.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Mineral/baby oil works too. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Jun 4 at 17:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.