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The condenser changes the state of the fluid from a saturated mixture to a saturated liquid by rejecting heat, yet the process occurs isothermally and isobarically. How then does it manage to perform a change of state?

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2 Answers 2

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Check out the latent heat of vaporization.

The energy comes from the change of state, same as water can go from ice to liquid or liquid to ice at zero deg C.

Have you plotted the cycle on an H-S diagram? if not then you should.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. But if it loses heat, how does the temperature stay the same? $\endgroup$
    – vinshield
    Commented May 21, 2022 at 13:26
  • $\begingroup$ @vinshield did you check out "latent" in "latent heat of vaporization"? Did you plot the H-S diagram? $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Commented May 21, 2022 at 13:27
  • $\begingroup$ Interesting. Thanks. Must be a delicate process effecting change of state without changing temperature, am I correct? $\endgroup$
    – vinshield
    Commented May 21, 2022 at 13:33
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    $\begingroup$ @vinshield theengineerspost.com/rankine-cycle $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Commented May 21, 2022 at 13:33
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At state 3, the steam is at temperature T2 and wet. However, it's difficult to stop condensation at 3 and then compress to 4. So, to answer your question, it's because of a different temperature at state 4. The water at state 4 is not at the saturation temperature that corresponds to the boiler pressure.

T-s diagram of the Rankine cycle

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