0
$\begingroup$

I have placed two microphones placed within 1 or 2 cm distance. They can receive and record sounds around them. I want to detect the distance of the sound source (specially human voice) and the direction of the sound source using those microphones. Is it feasible when the distance of the sound source is short (i.e. around 10 cm).

$\endgroup$
11
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ two microphones can detect direction, not distance $\endgroup$
    – jsotola
    May 7 at 19:15
  • $\begingroup$ Any way to estimate distance from microphones? Even using more than two mic? @jsotola $\endgroup$ May 7 at 19:21
  • $\begingroup$ think about it ... a pair of microphones can be used to determine the direction of the sound source ... adding a third microphone gives you three pairs of microphones $\endgroup$
    – jsotola
    May 7 at 19:25
  • $\begingroup$ You could use the mics to determine the distance between each other... $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    May 7 at 19:28
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Yes, but why do you need to determine the distance? What use is knowing the distance from someone's ears to their mouth? Your question says the microphones are 1 - 2 cm apart - now you're mentioning earbuds which would be the width of a head apart. Can you see why your readers could be confused? $\endgroup$
    – Transistor
    May 7 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

3
$\begingroup$

A sound source and listening device can only provide direction.

Multiple microphones is how passive submarine sonar works. This will give direction only. Note that microphones in a line can only provide the two mirror image directions, you can't discriminate from off-axis sounds from either side.

To get distance, you need an active sound emitter, and measure the time for the reflection to return. This is how radar works as well, but with radio waves.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Well, in theory (hah) if you know the dispersion curve of the media (atmosphere) and the structure of the source signal, you could analyze the relative arrival time of different frequency components. I wouldn't put a lot of faith in this approach. $\endgroup$ May 9 at 13:14
1
$\begingroup$

If the distance you want to measure is small than maybe you can use one of the microphone as a sound source.

But using a active sound emitter would be a better option.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.