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How do engineers design vibration monitoring for motors with different wattage? What effect does power have on vibration? I consulted manufacturers of these vibration monitoring and did not see any indications for which engines to apply. Thank you very much!

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Vibration monitoring will be based on equipment size and RPM, not on power. I assume we're talking electric motors, I've never seen vibration analysis done on IC engines, though I guess it's possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your response. But I think large power will affect the amplitude of vibration. From there, it affects the fault diagnosis models. Sorry if I don't understand in depth $\endgroup$
    – VuXuanCu
    Apr 20 at 1:24
  • $\begingroup$ Seen it a lot on wind turbines and there is a power blip as each blade passes the tower… $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Apr 20 at 3:30
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It’s about discerning the changes to a "normal" frequency signature for any engine or rotating mechanism.

Combustion pulses and crank revolutions occur regularly but a failing bearing adds a different signal or a new "pulse" to the signature.

Takes lots of data analysis, and having the vibration history with the repair story enables the correlation.

And there are papers published on this. It has been used on wind turbines as maintenance is very expensive based on their location so taking the right parts with you reduces the cost…

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  • $\begingroup$ Vibration analysis is critical to operation of large rotating machinery such as turbines and compressors. They will have transducers in a few locations so excursions in all three directions are monitored. The results are analyzed by computer to determine certain things like "swirl" , the center of a shaft following a pattern of movement. And this was 40 years ago,( The lab was next to ours). There will be serious book on "rotating machinery". $\endgroup$ Apr 19 at 23:44
  • $\begingroup$ My fav was an axial compressor driven by electric motor; Motor had a 14" diameter shaft , When the rotor was removed you could walk through the stator - about 8 ft. diameter opening. On start-up ,they had 10 minutes to reach synchronous speed by balancing flow and discharge pressure from the compressor. After 10 minutes they had to abort because the start winding would overheat. This machine has many stories. $\endgroup$ Apr 19 at 23:55

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