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I have to confess that thermodynamics is not a friend of mine.

My system consists of a volatile droplet sitting on a thermally conductive substrate. The energy balance comprises heat lost due to evaporative (self) cooling, heat conduction through the substrate and (probably, if the droplets surface temperature is sufficiently small) the heat of condensation due to water droplets nucleating on the droplet.

Now I disturb the system by passing air (at ambient temperature) with a certain velocity over the droplet. What will happen is that the evaporation rate of the droplet increases and the average droplet temperature decreases. But what I don't get is: Will the airflow also introduce heat, i.e. heat up the droplet to a small extend (as the temperature of the air is higher)? And is it correct to refer to this process as "heat transfer due to forced convection"? Does the concept of "forced convection" apply here anyway? I'm looking for the right words to describe the heat transfer.

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yes you can call it forced convection.

As a common example all the air conditioners blow hot or cold air to creat forced convection to condition the air in the space they serve.

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