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when we plot the shear or moment diagram we add hachures to the area created with these diagrams , in most cases we see vertical hachures, is it represent the internal forces? or its just used to highlight the area ? and can we use inclined hachures?enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ For the moment or shear diagram, the hatch is only meant to highlight the area. The vertical lines with arrowhead are important for the distributed load, especially when it acts against gravity. $\endgroup$
    – r13
    Mar 13, 2022 at 22:23

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In moment and shear/axial force diagrams, the hachure is completely arbitrary, it can be however you want it to be. In fact, I'd say it's most common (outside of textbooks) to use no hachure at all, just the beam and the curve describing the internal force.

enter image description here

Most times what we see aren't hachures but step-diagrams, where we see the value of the diagram at a given interval:

enter image description here

However, as @r13 correctly stated in their comment, the opposite is true when drawing a distributed load, where the direction of the force is very relevant, so drawing the hachure properly is necessary:

enter image description here

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