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I don't have engineering background. I'm looking for this telescope' altitude bearing below. I understand it's a type of ball bearing, but does anyone know the exact name of this type?

There are 2 bearings, one on each side, allowing the telescope tube to move up-down

Increasing/decreasing friction is done by tightening/loosening the black knob, which looks like the size of a tennis ball, around 2"-3"

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ bearings do not prevent overshoot when applied force is removed ... an opposing force has to be applied to counteract the inertia of the moving component $\endgroup$
    – jsotola
    Feb 22, 2022 at 3:41
  • $\begingroup$ @jsotola This. You move the telescope properly by planning it's acceleration and deceleration such that you achieve a compromise balance between settling time (overshoot and undershoot) and reaching the setpoint in a minimum amount of time. It's called damping in control systems. Overdamped, underdaped, and critically damped. If you're controlling it by hand and not a computer, then that control system is you and I guess you need to develop the skill. This might be made easier by using a damping grease to make things require more force so it's not so jittery for your hands. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 22, 2022 at 4:59
  • $\begingroup$ @DKNguyen that’s one reason why friction based dampers were invented prior to fancy control systems… $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Feb 22, 2022 at 5:57
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    $\begingroup$ @Motoko Oh you're asking for the name of the type of bearing in your photo? Can you get an even bigger photo? The bearing on the left almost looks like a thrust bearing that uses rollers to me. But it's a bit weird that it's used vertically if that is the case. But if you are just looking for bearings that can support a much larger radial load than ball bearings, then you are looking for roller/needle bearings. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 22, 2022 at 6:35
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    $\begingroup$ @DKNguyen Oh I see the confusion now, I have edited the question to clarify $\endgroup$
    – Motoko
    Feb 22, 2022 at 20:07

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From what I can tell there are two different types of bearing present.

The first one is this closed type. There is a marking which I believe is the bearing number.

enter image description here

I think I can make out a Z right at the end, which means that its a closed type. The rest of the number looks to me like 6005, which means that its a deep groove, single ball bearing with a bearing bore (hole diameter) of 25 mm.


Regarding the other one:

enter image description here

It looks like a thrust bearing (but I can't tell if it ball or something else). If the black plastic thing underneath is threaded, and its used to tighten and untighten the assembly that would make some sense. (This is on the realm of educated guess. --- this would be easier if the whole assembly and the functionality and design intent was clearer).

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  • $\begingroup$ The giant conical split / spring washer part is interesting. what material is it? might be what produces the axial force, doing the damping work??? $\endgroup$
    – Pete W
    Feb 22, 2022 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ That's my guess also. I can't really tell though. $\endgroup$
    – NMech
    Feb 22, 2022 at 14:33
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks so much @NMech! Some progress! Unfortunately I want to buy these for myself, and these pictures are from the internet. I have added some more pictures and updated the question to clarify.The way it works as I know is you tighten/loosen the black knob to increase/decrease friction, make it harder/easier to move move the tube up and down $\endgroup$
    – Motoko
    Feb 22, 2022 at 20:09

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