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I'm scouting some nozzles to fill in gas into a chamber. To get a better understanding of nozzles in general, I'm reading https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nozzle and I stumble already on the second sentence:

A nozzle is often a pipe or tube of varying cross sectional area..

In which way "often"? From my understanding it always provides a varying cross sectional area, otherwise I would simply call it a pipe?

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  • $\begingroup$ A pipe can direct fluid or check out orifice. $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Sep 28 '21 at 6:56
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, not to sure which argument this provides :) I'm wondering how is a nozzle different from a pipe? That it is not bent? $\endgroup$
    – Ben
    Sep 28 '21 at 7:26
  • $\begingroup$ Why not just give details of the real problem that you need to solve? flow rate, velocity, pattern etc $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Sep 28 '21 at 7:32
  • $\begingroup$ I'm a patent engineer so, actually, it is indeed about the wording/term. Thus, the Examiner states that a tube can be seen as a nozzle and that's why I wonder about what makes a tube a tube and/or a nozzle or vice versa and what are the differences. $\endgroup$
    – Ben
    Sep 28 '21 at 10:29
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    $\begingroup$ A nozzle is located at a termination point. A pipe may be a termination point if there is no special end to it, but a pipe can also be an intermediate item ie The sewer pipe runs from the house to the waste water treatment facility. $\endgroup$
    – Forward Ed
    Sep 28 '21 at 18:35
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There are many applications where the nozzles are just a straight short pipe.

in sprinklers, household faucets and shower heads.

in many simple paint pumps they use cheap disposable plastic straight nozzles.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the input though I think the examples do not fit as they modify the liquid when exiting a pipe (like widening the jet and so on). An ordinary pipe wouldn't do that, imho? $\endgroup$
    – Ben
    Sep 29 '21 at 6:55

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