0
$\begingroup$

I have a DC motor with a rated rpm of 2750. At max rpm, the rubber wheel that I've attached to it is pulling itself apart (literally, the rubber is being pulled away from the central hub due to the centrifugal force). How can I know before purchasing a new wheel weather it will be able to handle this rpm? Is there a way to estimate this or do I need a spec sheet? I haven't seen any wheels that have a spec sheet.

$\endgroup$
6
  • $\begingroup$ Can't really help wthout more detail. "Wheel" is super vague. There are hundreds if not thousands of different kinds of wheels all specified differently for different things. Generally though, I can't think of any applications where something is being moved by a wheel with tires has to spin at 2750RPM. Maybe landing wheels on the space shuttle. $\endgroup$ – DKNguyen May 19 at 5:32
  • $\begingroup$ I can't find the exact model but it's similar to this one: tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/… $\endgroup$ – parth_3320 May 19 at 5:38
  • $\begingroup$ and the motor: amazon.com/… $\endgroup$ – parth_3320 May 19 at 5:39
  • $\begingroup$ It doesn't have to spin that fast. But I don't have a speed controllers so I was hoping to find a sturdy wheel. $\endgroup$ – parth_3320 May 19 at 5:41
  • $\begingroup$ Most land wheels are not going to be designed to run anywhere near that speed so no specs. Maybe single molded wheels? $\endgroup$ – DKNguyen May 19 at 5:45
0
$\begingroup$

Since you don't need the wheel to spin that fast, what you could do is use a gear with a very high gear ratio.

You can easily get a gear ratio of 10 for any size of commercially available DC motors, which would reduce the rotational velocity to the wheel to about 300 rpm. Than would reduce the forces by approximately 100 times (centrifugal forces are proportional to $\omega^2$)

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.