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So basically imagine a plate being placed parallel to the direction of flow of water with water flowing with a certain velocity on one side of the plate and on the other side it is almost stagnant. What would be the force on this plate? Can I use the lift equation that is used for air-foils or there is any other method?

Water flowing ... |
with Velocity ..... | Almost stagnant water
.......................... |<--
` ........................ |<-- Lift Force?
.......................... |<--
........................... |
........................... |

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First off we assume you meant parallel flow because there is no flow perpendicular to a wall, there may be pressure, static and dynamic.

Depending on the current velocity, type of flow, flexibility of the plate, the case will start looking like an open channel flow.

If the plate is too flexible it could deform into convex and concave undulations giving rise to lift forces and wave creation in conjunction with the vibration of the plate into an increasingly higher amplitude, destructive flutter.

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  • $\begingroup$ I am actually designing an anchor for a curtain that is semi-permeable. It will enclose an area under which some construction will happen. Right outside that curtain, there is a channel where the water is flowing less than 5 ft /sec. Assuming that the water inside the curtain is stagnant is basically trying to get the worst load. $\endgroup$
    – Uttarayana
    May 1 at 22:44
  • $\begingroup$ you need to consider impact force, hydrostatic force, dynamic force, and even the possible negative forces on the lee side. $\endgroup$
    – kamran
    May 1 at 23:08
  • $\begingroup$ yep. complicated if membrane is flexible enough $\endgroup$
    – Pete W
    May 2 at 15:58

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