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Is this a picture of a plate girder train bridge or a deck truss train bridge?

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ It is a truss bridge. A plate girder is a solid I beam fitted up by plates for flanges and web. $\endgroup$
    – r13
    Apr 25 at 19:14
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    $\begingroup$ The part of the bridge to the left of the stone masonry pier in the photo is a steel deck truss rail bridge. The part of the bridge to the right of the stone masonry pier is a timber/wood girder on timber bents/piers. A plate girder is usually an I beam where the flanges are either welded/bolted/rivetted to web. Deep girders and bridge girders tend to be plate girders. I beams for buildings and lighter loads tend to be one piece of steel and will be what is referred to as a rolled section as passing the hot steel through a series of rollers forms the standard section size. $\endgroup$
    – Forward Ed
    May 10 at 2:27
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It's a truss bridge.

A quick Google Image search will make the difference between the bridge types clear.

This is a plate girder bridge:

enter image description here

And this is a truss bridge:

enter image description here

Basically, a girder bridge uses a few massive longitudinal beams while a truss instead uses a criss-cross of smaller beams instead.

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