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How would you add a fillet between two parts in a Solidworks assembly, and propagating the fillet body to one of the parts?

In the example below I have two parts, yellow and gray, and when adding an assembly fillet feature, Solidworks adds it to the gray part. I'd like to treat the grey cylinder as if it were part of the yellow part for the purposes of creating a fillet between them, and then propagate that fillet to the gray part. The second image shows what I'd like to achieve, but between two assembly parts instead of two part features.

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I found an example of a convoluted way of getting something like this to work, but I was hoping things have improved since the video was published in 2013. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IAGTlvgBgU

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3 Answers 3

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Open the grey part for editing.

Use insert part, to add the yellow part, making this a multibody

Use move/copy bodies to make a copy of the grey part in the same place

Merge the grey and one of the yellow parts using combine tool

Apply fillet

Subtract the yellow part using combine tool, with the copied body as a subtract source.

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I don't use Solidworks but I'd be surprised if you can fillet two separate parts. Fillets are generally applied to edges of one homogenous part.

In the example below I have two parts, yellow and gray, and when adding an assembly fillet feature, Solidworks adds it to the gray part.

That supports my theory. The edge belongs to the grey part only. Solidworks has reacted correctly.

I'd like to treat the grey cylinder as if it were part of the yellow part for the purposes of creating a fillet between them, and then propagate that fillet to the gray part.

You need to merge the two parts somehow.

The second image shows what I'd like to achieve, but between two assembly parts instead of two part features.

You can't because the two parts don't share an edge.

I was hoping things have improved since the video was published ...

It's not a limitation of the software. It's that filleting two separate objects doesn't make sense.

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This is similar to Johnathan's answer, but I would add some dummy extrudes to the grey part, apply the fillet, and then cut off the extrudes.

That's assuming the fillet you're generating is going to be complicated. In most practical cases I would probably just extrude or revolve a simplified fillet onto the gray part by manually drawing it.

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  • $\begingroup$ I recommend using the yellow as a reference as if the yellow faves moved, or even there was a fillet between the two yellow faces etc. this would update accordingly. I agree that in a simple case it makes sense to model the fillet directly, however. $\endgroup$ Apr 26, 2021 at 21:28

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