0
$\begingroup$

I wonder if someone knows a control theory model that explains the reason why using our two hands (typically in opposing directions) improves gun shooting precision. A similar situation seems to happen when be hold pencil between two fingers, or when we try to position a small object, or when you try to position some object with the two hands instead of just one.

Is there some general principle going on? Can someone model the situation mathematically?

Some pictures below:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
7
  • $\begingroup$ you mean shooting with a gun right? At first sight, I tried hard to imagine shooting an arrow with hands (arms) in opposing directions. $\endgroup$ Apr 21 at 21:13
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Photo / diagram? I can't imagine what you are asking other than one hand comes from the left and the other from the right. $\endgroup$
    – Transistor
    Apr 21 at 21:56
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ My writing does not improve when writing with both hands on the pencil. $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Apr 21 at 23:07
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the comments. I have added some pictures of the cases I had in mind. $\endgroup$ Apr 22 at 20:06
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Isn't this just because you can bring more force to bear and the forces are opposing so help to cancel out assymetries? All your examples are also biased since you could simply attribute it to some deficiency in the human hand rather than any fundamental principle. You would need to include examples of things other than hands as well. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Apr 23 at 5:54
1
$\begingroup$

This is unfortunately not as interesting as one would hope. It is simply a stability issue.

The barrol of a small pistol is not a lot of length to adjust for angle changes, if we assume the barrol is 100mm long, if you hold with one hand the grip a little lower or a little higher, you may be a degree off...and by the time you fire, that one degree angle can be meters off target 10,20m away.

If you can simply hold the gun more stable to adjust for the difference in grip to adjust (with practice) the angle differences, you can shoot more accurately...also your ability to withstand recoil (which is probably the largest factor throwing your aim off) is larger.

It‘s not much of a control theory problem as much as it‘s a stability problem.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

Figure 1. Linkage anchored at one point and at two points.

With a single lever the arm can be forced by applied torque. With a triangular grip arrangement the resistance to torque is far higher.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.