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We have conducted tensile testing after casting(using test specimen from casted parts), but results are not met the required value. (Due to highest wall thickness / material accumulation)

How to check the material property in this case?

what type of practice will be used for material testing after casted parts in tensile testing?

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you provide more information regarding the actual values and the materials used? Also, if you could rephrase the question, to make it more understandable, it might be easier to obtain a helpful answer. $\endgroup$ – NMech Apr 19 at 8:48
  • $\begingroup$ I have updated now, is it clear now? $\endgroup$ – Kanaga Senthil Raja Apr 19 at 9:26
  • $\begingroup$ It is definitely better (still there some issues: e.g. but results are not met the required value. As I mentioned before, it will be easier if you provide a bit more detail about your setup. E.g. What material are you using. What are the properties you got? What were the properties you were expecting? Maybe give a rough sketch on the die casting dimensions and/or your test specimen... $\endgroup$ – NMech Apr 19 at 9:31
  • $\begingroup$ Restating the other comments : Helpful suggestions could be made if any specific information was presented; alloy, tests, results, requirements, size or volume of parts, etc. $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 May 20 at 14:25
  • $\begingroup$ Did the cast follow any standard regarding chemical composition and process, and where was the "comparing value" came from? $\endgroup$ – r13 Jun 18 at 21:03
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Your question is a bit hard to understand; my thought is you must now discover the source of the low values so that the quality of your castings can be improved to meet the specification.

To do this, you will need to inspect and examine the microstructure of the failed parts where they broke in the testing machine.

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Because the test coupons cut from the part did not meet specification , the parts do not meet specification. Very generally , for materials other than steel ,the failure implies the chemistry is wrong. For steels ,you should consider a heat-treatment. Depending on material , the mold "shake-out" temperature can affect physical properties. For many specifications using test coupons cast separately from the parts is illegal. There are chapters in quality assurance books to prevent a manufacturer from doing something "creative " with test coupons to pass a test when the product will not pass the test.

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  • $\begingroup$ At the extreme , this question is asking how to falsify test results. $\endgroup$ – blacksmith37 May 19 at 15:15

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