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I have a Galaxy Note2 with a front glass layer that is broken, while the screen itself is ok, as well as the touch panel.

If I understand properly, the front glass has only a protective function and is not the same as a "touch panel".

My question is, how technically does the glass transfer the touch actions to the touch panel? On the answer I will base the way of the glass replacement.

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  • $\begingroup$ It's entirely possible that the touch sensors (or something else) are glued to the glass, so on removal you could break the phone completely. Any reason why you don't take it to be fixed by an authorized store? $\endgroup$ – Wasabi Aug 31 '15 at 11:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Wasabi it will cost 200$... so I try to find some cheaper solution $\endgroup$ – Ilan Aug 31 '15 at 11:01
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    $\begingroup$ @Ilan buy a new phone. $\endgroup$ – ratchet freak Aug 31 '15 at 11:15
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    $\begingroup$ The glass is pain to remove, but its possible to replace the digitizer and the glass. My friend does this for a living. It is however a painstaking process and in many cases its easier to buy a new one. But its worth it for highly overpriced models. $\endgroup$ – joojaa Aug 31 '15 at 12:23
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    $\begingroup$ Replacing the glass, if you can do it without harming the digitizer, is very inexpensive. You can get some aftermarket kits for around $10 and although the process is painstakingly slow and delicate (especially without a heat gun), it's not particularly complicated. But just because the phone is a "Galaxy" model does not mean it uses the same parts as every other "Galaxy" device. You should consult a professional for advice about replacement, we can only reasonably address the technology here. $\endgroup$ – Air Aug 31 '15 at 16:04
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Glass fronted touch screens use capacitance to detect fingers. Multi touch will use projected capacitance.

projected-capacitive touchscreen
image source: wikipedia

however the capacitors are bonded to the glass panel. Replacing the screen will often be more expensive than just buying a new device and turning in the old one for recycling.

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  • $\begingroup$ Am I right that the Glass is pure glass without any electronic elements? Thus, it can be replaced by another piece of suitable glass? $\endgroup$ – Ilan Aug 31 '15 at 9:12
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    $\begingroup$ @Ilan, read the answer again. The touch capacitors are bonded to the glass. So yes, the glass is just glass (well, actually, it's Gorilla Glass (or similar), which probably has additives), but the sensors can't be removed and attached to the new glass. $\endgroup$ – Wasabi Aug 31 '15 at 11:13
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    $\begingroup$ @Wasabi - Gorilla Glass is made by Corning and they use a number of additives in the glass making process in order to provide its strength and durability. $\endgroup$ – user16 Aug 31 '15 at 11:54
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    $\begingroup$ @Wasabi Your comment is demonstrably incorrect. $\endgroup$ – Air Aug 31 '15 at 16:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Air, well bugger all. Now I feel like a fool. Also, that video seems like the actual answer the OP is after. The posted question just seems like a step towards doing exactly this. That channel actually has a much better quality video. It's for the S3, but they seem similar enough. $\endgroup$ – Wasabi Aug 31 '15 at 17:53

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