0
$\begingroup$

If we heat air along a pipe that's tilted at 30° to the horizontal using parabolic troughs, the air should rise upwards (I'm not sure how fast or powerfully) and then connect the outlet at the top into a Tesla turbine, shouldn't it generate power?

Please explain the heat engine concepts here, because in my understanding, there SHOULDN'T be a need for an air pump (to pump air in the CSP piping) as the hot air rising up will inevitably create low pressure and cooler air will replace it from under. And there SHOULDN'T be a need for a cooling fluid as the hot air should just exit from the Tesla turbine, giving up (if not 90% efficiently) it's kinetic energy to the turbine?

Is there something I misunderstand? Also correct me about such: as write this, I am starting to believe the air will not exit from the turbine at all and a "suck back" effect will happen at the bottom, i.e. the hot air will build up pressure and exit from the bottom, destroying my whole idea.

$\endgroup$
0
3
$\begingroup$

Could you get it to work, sure. There are dozens of ways to turn heat into energy.

Could you get it to work at scale and cost effectively? Almost certainly not. There's just not enough energy in heated air to do much, and the capital costs of the system break the effort. This is another entry into the "Why can't Stirling engines give us almost free power" file.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.