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In electrical i usually use cross-references to identify their symbols locations, I am still yet a lot to discover P&ID. So my question is, does P&ID have this such of thing?

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    $\begingroup$ I think "cross-reference" might be a useful term for this feature. $\endgroup$
    – Transistor
    Mar 15 '21 at 9:05
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! that is what was i searching for, the terms. Cross reference $\endgroup$ Mar 18 '21 at 0:53
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Physical location
It depends. Ideally, every actutator(including hand operated valves) and sensor should have a unique identifier (Don't know the english term, the german terms are AKZ or KKS). These usually show up in the wiring diagram too. The identifying scheme changes from plant to plant, it is IME unusual to indicate physcial location - usually it's pureyl functional (example: everything to do with the emergency flare starts with 7123, if you are lucky these valves and sensors etc are also nearby the the flare)

Normally, you have a list for all sensors, actutators, occasionally for manually operated valves anda list for all sensors. The physical location should be apparent from the descriptor of the part, it can (but this is unusual IME) be marked in drawings. Usually the location in the P&ID is sufficient to find the item in the drawing (example: first valve in flow direction on the pressure side of a pump).

you can also indicate physical location in a P&ID by drawing boxes around components within the same room or building. A lot depends on how complicated the plant is.

When BIM is used, it is possible to integrate the P&ID with the physical drawings, so that each item and pipeline in the drawing is matched with the P&ID.

Cross references
Typically a P&ID has far fewer pages than a wiring diagram (often only one), One uses arrows and text boxes that connect different P&ID pages or diagrams.

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This, from the DIN ISO EN 10628-1 is actually a poor example - there's no clear indication (drawing number etc.) where the arrow connects.

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    $\begingroup$ I think the OP is referring to the "cross-reference". In the example we can see TOR1 on this page but the cross-reference below the motor shows the page reference for each of its three contacts. $\endgroup$
    – Transistor
    Mar 15 '21 at 11:17
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    $\begingroup$ possibly. typically a P&ID has far fewer pages than a wiring diagram (often only one), there's arrows and text boxes that connect different P&ID pages or diagrams. $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Mar 15 '21 at 12:14
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    $\begingroup$ I see, thank you for answer. So, essentially P&ID have their own way to cross-referencing on what they desired. Since, the number of pages of P&ID is relatively have sufficient information and easier to identify which i think in my opinion is why they do not really need to have the "cross-reference" same as the electrical. Again, thanks for you insight, i really appreciated it. $\endgroup$ Mar 18 '21 at 0:52

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