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There is few material on net related to stroboscope applications. since it is an optical device, it is best used to control the vibrations of rotary devices like turbine blades electromotors etc.

but is it also useful if you want to control the vibrations of a lump mass ( big and heavy structure) doing very small vibration in its place in very high frequencies ? I don't give a number of how much or how big ( up to you to consider the proportions)

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Is stroboscope a useful device to control the translational vibrations?

No.

A stroboscope, also known as a strobe, is an instrument used to make a cyclically moving object appear to be slow-moving, or stationary. It consists of either a rotating disk with slots or holes or a lamp such as a flashtube which produces brief repetitive flashes of light. Wikipedia.

A classic example is the stroboscope used to set the timing on a petrol engine. The strobe lamp is triggered by the ignition system and the light pointed at the timing belt pulley which has a mark on it. The effect is to "freeze" the timing mark against the timing scale mounted on the engine block so that you can read the timing angle.

There is few material on net related to stroboscope applications.

I'm sure there are thousands of articles and videos.

Since it is an optical device, it is best used to control the vibrations of rotary devices like turbine blades electromotors etc.

No. It is used for inspection, not control, although it is feasible that a vision system could use the data to correct a process.

But is it also useful if you want to control the vibrations of a lump mass (big and heavy structure) doing very small vibration in its place in very high frequencies?

Probably not.

Have a look at Amplified video motion which will give you some ideas for search terms.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much $\endgroup$ Jan 29 at 23:53
  • $\begingroup$ . The effect is to "freeze" the timing mark against the timing scale mounted on the engine block so that you can read the timing angle. This phrase was difficult to understand shall you explain more please $\endgroup$ Jan 29 at 23:54
  • $\begingroup$ @FabioSpaghetti, see youtu.be/nM3LRV20l6c. $\endgroup$
    – Transistor
    Jan 30 at 10:18
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Yes it is, and portable stroboscopes are commonly used in industry to help visualize linear vibrations as well as rotary ones. You will also find it handy to have on hand an oscilloscope and microphone for measuring vibrations because this setup will also furnish you with information on the spectrum of different frequencies present in the system, which is good to know.

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  • $\begingroup$ Shall you please and very please make an example in your answer and help me understand what to expect? It only shows one number which is the frequency of vibration or some preset number as frequency, how do I end up with spectrum from that? $\endgroup$ Jan 28 at 21:57
  • $\begingroup$ the oscilloscope shows the actual shape of the waveform on a computer screen. From that shape you can find the wavelengths of each part of the signal. A special type of oscilloscope called a spectrum analyzer can do this for you automatically, and is commonly used to study and measure acoustic/vibrational signals of all types. you can convert a laptop to a spectrum analyzer with a special add-on input board and an app running on it. $\endgroup$ Jan 28 at 22:02
  • $\begingroup$ You used the term oscilloscope, is it the same thing as stroboscope? What is the plug in and the app and is there any instructions that you could link me to see how to do the test? $\endgroup$ Jan 29 at 5:13
  • $\begingroup$ no, an oscilloscope looks like a tiny television set on which glowing lines appear. $\endgroup$ Jan 29 at 6:04
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much, though your answer is very useful for me too but I need to understand about the strobe $\endgroup$ Jan 29 at 6:44

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