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I did some research and found out that in order to generate that amount of electricity( consider about 100MW) the size of the Stirling engine will be very big as compared to that of a steam turbine.

But then some articles said that upon using helium in the Stirling engine the size will become much smaller. This will also increase the power density of the engine.

If this is the case then why is Stirling engine not used, is this due to lack of research since steam turbines became popular.

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you update the question to include the references/url links to the articles you are referring to? $\endgroup$
    – NMech
    Jan 26 '21 at 6:42
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My guess, is that even with helium the power density of the Stirling engine would not be that great compared to the steam engine, helium is quite expensive to be used in large volume application and also has a tendency to leak.

From the Power to weight ratio widipedia page, the power to weight ratio for a Stirling engine made by NASA and DOE in 1985 is 0.30 [kW/kg].

For comparison, the 1930's Junkers Jumo 205A two-stroke, diesel, opposed-piston engine had almost double weight to ratio (1.1 kW/kg).

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