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I'm hoping for some clarification regarding converting torque to force at point of contact. I'm tightening some threaded components, the end faces of each are machined and will form a metal-metal seal under compression. I would like an idea of the force being applied at the interface due to a prescribed torque.

Using T = F.r (neglecting friction) the following values apply: T = 5N.m (setting of torque wrench) r = 0,0275 m (lever length of torque wrench)

I calculate F = 181,82 N but I think this force is referring to how hard my arm is pushing the wrench to achieve the desired torque.

Can anyone clarify this and suggest how I might go about finding the force at the interface?

Thanks in advance.

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    $\begingroup$ That's a pretty short torque wrench you got there :P maybe a 0 too much behind the comma? $\endgroup$ – OpticalResonator Jan 13 at 12:28
  • $\begingroup$ Arg! You're correct - I've mistyped! However, am I correct in thinking that I'm actually calcuating the force applied to the wrench rather than the force provided to the interface? ^_^ $\endgroup$ – richyo1000 Jan 13 at 12:48
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It sounds like you want the clamp force, or axial force applied by the screw threads based on your input torque (radial force x lever arm). Here's a useful calculator

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks jko - I've used the calculator and found what seems to be reasonable answer! $\endgroup$ – richyo1000 Jan 13 at 12:51

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