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I am currently designed a structure that require hexagonal nuts to be placed side by side in honeycomb pattern, welded upon sheet. Other than doing it in old-fashioned way, is there any way/technique/machine/tools i might have missed to achieve the goal quickly?

Thank you in advance for your input, really appreciate any

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    $\begingroup$ RivNuts/Pem Nuts? $\endgroup$ Jan 11 at 11:23
  • $\begingroup$ why do you need nuts for the hexagonal pattern, not tapped holes (as per solar mikes answer)? How thick is the sheet? sizes of the nuts? Why weld, would another connection be ok too? (solder, glue ...) $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Jan 11 at 12:50
  • $\begingroup$ what exactly is the "old fashioned" way? $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Jan 11 at 12:51
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    $\begingroup$ @mart and prepping each nut to get weld penetration... $\endgroup$
    – Solar Mike
    Jan 11 at 12:52
  • $\begingroup$ @mart from the tone of your question it seems you're suggesting no quicker way to weld hex nuts in such pattern, yes? I thought the same. Here to make sure if i don't miss any available options. Wish i have other choices.. Its 1/2" nuts anyway. Well, i never solder a metal before, but certainly gluing wont work $\endgroup$
    – gijoe
    Jan 11 at 13:22
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The fastest method to attach hex nuts to sheet metal would be to modify a stud welder. A commercial stud welder is grounded to the metal plate and the threaded stud is held in the opposite electrode. Applying pressure to the stud against the plate closes a switch, dumping a rather large current through the stud, effectively spot welding it to the plate. A quick search returned a custom-made nut spot welder video of about a minute length. The same search returned a number of "spot welding nuts" videos and related links.

Note in the linked video, the square nuts have convex bottoms, causing the corners to contact the surface first, concentrating the current in those locations, ensuring that a weld is formed.

A flat hex nut would require substantially more energy/current than one with, say, a triple point profile.

Another answer is brazing, as one can place the nuts are required, on a surface pre-coated with flux and apply sufficient heat to secure the nuts. The brazing would not require the entire sheet to be heated at once, but the heat can be applied in a moving wave. Big torches, plenty of gas, I think it could be done.

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Why do this with nuts?

Use a thick plate (12 or 14mm) then drill and tap the required positions.

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  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately not possible in this specific design. It has to be nuts due to its hex shape $\endgroup$
    – gijoe
    Jan 11 at 11:32

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