0
$\begingroup$

In split air conditioners, there are two tubes connecting the indoor unit and the outdoor unit. According to the generic schematics I find online (like this one), they are part of the closed circuit for coolant gas.

But most systems have a "dry" function that removes moisture from air. Where does the water goes, if there is no water/air connection between the indoor and the outdoor units? Or the tubes function is different from what the drawing shows, and there is indeed a water line, then how the coolant flows between the indoor and outdoor units?

PS: I could use a "heat-pump" tag here.

$\endgroup$
5
$\begingroup$

Split system air conditions (heat pumps) are refrigerator based systems. The two tubes you mention transport refrigerant from the compressor in the outdoor to unit to the indoor unit & return it from the indoor unit to the compressor in the outdoor unit, in a closed loop.

Water is removed from the atmosphere by condensation, by the indoor unit. This water leaves the indoor unit via another, usually short tube, which goes through the wall of the building for the water to either go into a drain or just drop to the ground.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

The indoor coil cabinet has a catch pan and drain. The installer has to connect a drain pipe to the cabinet and then get the water outside somehow. Common options are to tie the pipe into a house drain (or drain vent line), gravity drain the water using a separate pipe to the outside, or collect the water in a small tank and pump it outside or into the building's drain system. The pump systems must have a float switch that shuts down the AC if the pump fails to empty the catchtank.

These AC drains clog up all the time. You have to use a wet/dry shop vac on the exit to suck all the snot out of them - often several times a year - which kind of sucks if you are dealing with a 300 room hotel. The point being that when you run the drain line, realize that this thing needs to be accessible at the daylight side. if connected to the house drain, make it short with a cleanout and install a ball valve upstream of the cleanout, and use the pressure side of the vacuum to blow the line with the valve closed.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.