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i have a question regarding on PID standards ISO 14617. Below is the attached symbol graphic, i seem cannot find anywhere what actually this symbol refer to from standards that i have looked up; PIP, ISO, DIN and BS. I would appreciate if anyone could clarify this to me and also it would be great to have a website or anything on where i could refer for more information about standards.

Thank you

so here i attached the diagram, i did lookup to https://www.edrawsoft.com/pid/images/pid-legend.pdf

it says triangle separator, enter image description here

so here is the diagram that i refer to enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ It would help if you posted the context. i.e. the rest of the diagram. As mark says it might be a one way valve or a diode depending on the context $\endgroup$
    – NMech
    Nov 11 '20 at 7:19
  • $\begingroup$ the line is indeed a pipe, yes? what's the medium? specific industry? $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Nov 11 '20 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your replies, i already add a diagram that i refer to, yeah it is a pipe. This is closed loop cooling water if i not mistaken. $\endgroup$ Nov 12 '20 at 1:11
  • $\begingroup$ I doubt it's a separator, a separator should have one mass flow in and two out. Also note that the other symbol for triangle separator looks like a pipe expansion/reduction and also shows up in the diagram where you would expect such a thing. Look if you find a check valve somewhere in the diagram, pressure side of a pump is a good place to look. $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Nov 13 '20 at 11:06
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I would guess it's a non-standard symbol for a check valve. @NMech is correct that it looks like a diode, but that would not appear on a P&ID. A check valve is a fluid flow equivalent of a diode though. I did find a reference that shows that symbol as a check valve here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Exactly what I thought. yet the 'VS9' next to the symbol got me puzzled. $\endgroup$
    – Algo
    Nov 11 '20 at 9:46
  • $\begingroup$ @Algo - It's hard to tell, but I interpreted that note as "V59" - valve number 59. As NMech suggests, seeing more of the diagram would help understand the context. $\endgroup$
    – Mark
    Nov 11 '20 at 15:49
  • $\begingroup$ I think numering schemes like <letters + numbers for plant area/functional group> <letters denoting component type ><individual numbers> are common, so valve 59 or stop valve 9 seems plausible. $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Nov 11 '20 at 16:11
  • $\begingroup$ but this is guessing around somthing the op could esily answer. $\endgroup$
    – mart
    Nov 11 '20 at 16:11
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you guys for replying, yeah it does look like a diode. Im sorry, so already add an attachment for more diagram. V59 is the number of the valve but could not identify whether it is a standard symbol or not. $\endgroup$ Nov 12 '20 at 1:13
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In process engineering, you may use it as a check valve, although the most common used symbol for check valves is:

enter image description here

The symbol in the OPis most commonly used in electronic diagrams, and it is used to describe a diode (there is such think as a VS9 diode datasheet).

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your replies, it is a PID not a electronic diagram. Therefore it is not diode, sorry for not giving a bigger diagram for this. It is a valve, but don't know what kind of valve is this and whether it comply to a standard. $\endgroup$ Nov 12 '20 at 1:15

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