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If we could transfer energy wirelessly with 100% at short range. Then what if we create a motor that have both stator and rotor be an electromagnet? By putting a magnetic coupling to transmit energy from stator and rotor would have a coupling receiver that output energy to magnetic winding

The design would be exactly the same as a DC motor. Maybe a design like a brush DC motor that replaces the brush with a wireless energy receiver and electronics controller. Or a brushless DC motor with only a wireless energy receiver.

Unlike induction motor or conventional DC motor, both stator and rotor are electromagnet pushing and pulling each other directly So we wouldn't need a permanent magnet at all but I think it would provide more torque and efficiency than an induction motor, and more comparable with a DC motor

But I can't find anyone who designs a motor this way. Is there any problem or disadvantage of this concept?

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We have those. But with wires. They're called universal motors and they use commutators to get the electricity to the rotor.

Short-range wireless energy transfer is not terrible. But how does it work? Magnetic fields. And how do motors work? Magnetic fields. And you realize that it must be much easier to use the magnetic field to directly spin the motor, instead of converting the magnetic field to an electric current and then back to a different magnetic field. And we have those too. They're called induction motors.

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If I understand your question correctly, I believe such motors already exist. You should check reluctance motors . They come in different flavours

  • Switched reluctance motors
  • synchronous reluctance motors

You can also read this article at power transmission

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think it is. Is the rotor part of reluctant motor is also an electromagnet? Not just ferromagnetic material? $\endgroup$ – Thaina Oct 28 '20 at 7:42
  • $\begingroup$ As far as I understand it is a ferromagnetic material (but not a permanent magnet) or coils. However, isn't that what an electromagnet uses? From your comment I understand that what you after is to transfer the energy wirelesly to the rotor, then convert it to electrical energy and charge the rotor coils? $\endgroup$ – NMech Oct 28 '20 at 7:55
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not so sure but I think reluctance motors don't use coil on the rotor side. While I think there should be coil on both rotor and stator. Is reluctance motor have higher efficiency than dc motor? $\endgroup$ – Thaina Oct 28 '20 at 8:30
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    $\begingroup$ Compared to brushed dc motors (75-80%) they SRM have a slight edge (~90%). See [link ](mpoweruk.com/motorsbrushless.htm), however it depends a lot on the implementation $\endgroup$ – NMech Oct 28 '20 at 8:40

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