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What is the amount of force required to cause the beam to deflect, shear or otherwise fail?

The force would be generated by a hydraulic piston. Let's call those units PSI. The piston will be mounted to the flange by the brackets at each end. They will be L4" x 6" x 5/8" that is 4" long. A piece of 5/8" plate will be welded to the center of the angle. 4 holes will mount the base plate of the piston to the bracket with 7/16" bolts. The brackets will be back gouged and welded to the flange of the W12x14# 6" from the end of the beam

The beam will be 4' long and the hydraulic piston will move along a 12" span. It will clamp onto and press varying thicknesses from 0" thick up to 12" thick. The piston itself will be 18" long and can be mounted from either end of the beam. A 6" die will be mounted to the opposing end as the piston.

The beam and brackets are both A36 steel. All welds will be mig.

Let's say failure = deflection so great the beam will not return to its original shape. Or where the beam fractures / tears etc.

I would assume there would be a point where the force generated would simply bend the beam, without generating additional increase in psi. That would be failure as well.

I made a dwg. File but can't figure out how to upload it the jpg quality isn't great. Hm.

Please let me know if there's anything else I can add to make this more clear / solvable. Thanks!

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  • $\begingroup$ Please edit your question to include more detail and an example of what you have tried so far to solve your question. Also, deflection is a very different issue than shear or other failure. What are you trying to solve? $\endgroup$ – hazzey Sep 25 '20 at 21:08
  • $\begingroup$ No beam is infinitely stiff, so any non-zero force will cause deflection. Even the weight of the beam itself will cause deflection. How much deflection is acceptable? $\endgroup$ – Jonathan R Swift Sep 25 '20 at 21:31
  • $\begingroup$ The point were the beam will not return to its original shape. $\endgroup$ – Elciteeve Sep 25 '20 at 21:44
  • $\begingroup$ To me its not clear a) how long are the brackets and b) how are they attached to the beam. In the image I see a plate and the brackets. $\endgroup$ – NMech Sep 26 '20 at 0:15

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